Lifetime risk of total hip replacement surgery and temporal trends in utilization

A population-based analysis

Megan Bohensky, Ilana Ackerman, Richard De Steiger, Alexandra Gorelik, Caroline Brand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To investigate lifetime risk of total hip replacement (THR) surgery in the state of Victoria, Australia and to describe temporal trends in THR incidence. Methods We analyzed a retrospective population-based longitudinal cohort of patients who received a primary THR in Victoria from 1998-2009. The factors potentially contributing to changes in lifetime risk were also examined, including temporal changes in THR incidence according to health care setting (public versus private), socioeconomic status, and geographic location (regional versus metropolitan). Results We identified 45,775 patients receiving THR over the time period. For a woman age 20-29 years, the mortality-adjusted lifetime risk rose significantly over time, from 8.49% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 8.23-8.69%) in 1999-2000 to 10.30% (95% CI 10.07-10.49%) in 2007-2008. For a man age 20-29 years, the mortality-adjusted lifetime risk also increased significantly, from 9.29% (95% CI 8.97-9.58%) in 1999-2000 to 10.27% (95% CI 9.95-10.48%) in 2004-2005, but in contrast to the pattern observed for women, it decreased slightly in 2007-2008 (9.90% [95% CI 9.60-10.16%]). We also identified an increasing number of THRs in private hospitals, in people in middle and low socioeconomic groups, and in rural areas. Conclusion The lifetime risk of THR for women was similar to men, despite a higher burden of hip osteoarthritis, and this warrants further investigation. However, increases in the number of THR procedures performed for patients in regional areas and in lower socioeconomic groups suggest some reductions over time in known disparities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1213-1219
Number of pages7
JournalArthritis Care and Research
Volume66
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2014

Cite this

@article{aea36d85ee4249089b070a1c64a1fd8c,
title = "Lifetime risk of total hip replacement surgery and temporal trends in utilization: A population-based analysis",
abstract = "Objective To investigate lifetime risk of total hip replacement (THR) surgery in the state of Victoria, Australia and to describe temporal trends in THR incidence. Methods We analyzed a retrospective population-based longitudinal cohort of patients who received a primary THR in Victoria from 1998-2009. The factors potentially contributing to changes in lifetime risk were also examined, including temporal changes in THR incidence according to health care setting (public versus private), socioeconomic status, and geographic location (regional versus metropolitan). Results We identified 45,775 patients receiving THR over the time period. For a woman age 20-29 years, the mortality-adjusted lifetime risk rose significantly over time, from 8.49{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval [95{\%} CI] 8.23-8.69{\%}) in 1999-2000 to 10.30{\%} (95{\%} CI 10.07-10.49{\%}) in 2007-2008. For a man age 20-29 years, the mortality-adjusted lifetime risk also increased significantly, from 9.29{\%} (95{\%} CI 8.97-9.58{\%}) in 1999-2000 to 10.27{\%} (95{\%} CI 9.95-10.48{\%}) in 2004-2005, but in contrast to the pattern observed for women, it decreased slightly in 2007-2008 (9.90{\%} [95{\%} CI 9.60-10.16{\%}]). We also identified an increasing number of THRs in private hospitals, in people in middle and low socioeconomic groups, and in rural areas. Conclusion The lifetime risk of THR for women was similar to men, despite a higher burden of hip osteoarthritis, and this warrants further investigation. However, increases in the number of THR procedures performed for patients in regional areas and in lower socioeconomic groups suggest some reductions over time in known disparities.",
author = "Megan Bohensky and Ilana Ackerman and {De Steiger}, Richard and Alexandra Gorelik and Caroline Brand",
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Lifetime risk of total hip replacement surgery and temporal trends in utilization : A population-based analysis. / Bohensky, Megan; Ackerman, Ilana; De Steiger, Richard; Gorelik, Alexandra; Brand, Caroline.

In: Arthritis Care and Research, Vol. 66, No. 8, 08.2014, p. 1213-1219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lifetime risk of total hip replacement surgery and temporal trends in utilization

T2 - A population-based analysis

AU - Bohensky, Megan

AU - Ackerman, Ilana

AU - De Steiger, Richard

AU - Gorelik, Alexandra

AU - Brand, Caroline

PY - 2014/8

Y1 - 2014/8

N2 - Objective To investigate lifetime risk of total hip replacement (THR) surgery in the state of Victoria, Australia and to describe temporal trends in THR incidence. Methods We analyzed a retrospective population-based longitudinal cohort of patients who received a primary THR in Victoria from 1998-2009. The factors potentially contributing to changes in lifetime risk were also examined, including temporal changes in THR incidence according to health care setting (public versus private), socioeconomic status, and geographic location (regional versus metropolitan). Results We identified 45,775 patients receiving THR over the time period. For a woman age 20-29 years, the mortality-adjusted lifetime risk rose significantly over time, from 8.49% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 8.23-8.69%) in 1999-2000 to 10.30% (95% CI 10.07-10.49%) in 2007-2008. For a man age 20-29 years, the mortality-adjusted lifetime risk also increased significantly, from 9.29% (95% CI 8.97-9.58%) in 1999-2000 to 10.27% (95% CI 9.95-10.48%) in 2004-2005, but in contrast to the pattern observed for women, it decreased slightly in 2007-2008 (9.90% [95% CI 9.60-10.16%]). We also identified an increasing number of THRs in private hospitals, in people in middle and low socioeconomic groups, and in rural areas. Conclusion The lifetime risk of THR for women was similar to men, despite a higher burden of hip osteoarthritis, and this warrants further investigation. However, increases in the number of THR procedures performed for patients in regional areas and in lower socioeconomic groups suggest some reductions over time in known disparities.

AB - Objective To investigate lifetime risk of total hip replacement (THR) surgery in the state of Victoria, Australia and to describe temporal trends in THR incidence. Methods We analyzed a retrospective population-based longitudinal cohort of patients who received a primary THR in Victoria from 1998-2009. The factors potentially contributing to changes in lifetime risk were also examined, including temporal changes in THR incidence according to health care setting (public versus private), socioeconomic status, and geographic location (regional versus metropolitan). Results We identified 45,775 patients receiving THR over the time period. For a woman age 20-29 years, the mortality-adjusted lifetime risk rose significantly over time, from 8.49% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 8.23-8.69%) in 1999-2000 to 10.30% (95% CI 10.07-10.49%) in 2007-2008. For a man age 20-29 years, the mortality-adjusted lifetime risk also increased significantly, from 9.29% (95% CI 8.97-9.58%) in 1999-2000 to 10.27% (95% CI 9.95-10.48%) in 2004-2005, but in contrast to the pattern observed for women, it decreased slightly in 2007-2008 (9.90% [95% CI 9.60-10.16%]). We also identified an increasing number of THRs in private hospitals, in people in middle and low socioeconomic groups, and in rural areas. Conclusion The lifetime risk of THR for women was similar to men, despite a higher burden of hip osteoarthritis, and this warrants further investigation. However, increases in the number of THR procedures performed for patients in regional areas and in lower socioeconomic groups suggest some reductions over time in known disparities.

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U2 - 10.1002/acr.22279

DO - 10.1002/acr.22279

M3 - Article

VL - 66

SP - 1213

EP - 1219

JO - Arthritis Care and Research

JF - Arthritis Care and Research

SN - 2151-464X

IS - 8

ER -