Life expectancy of type 1 diabetic patients during 1997–2010: A national Australian registry-based cohort study

Lili Huo, Jessica L. Harding, Anna Peeters, Jonathan E. Shaw, Dianna J. Magliano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Aims/hypothesis: There is limited information about the impact of type 1 diabetes on life expectancy in a contemporary population. We examined the life expectancy of type 1 diabetic patients and explored the contribution of mortality at different ages and of different causes of death to years of life lost (YLL) compared with the general population. Methods: We derived mortality rates of Australians with type 1 diabetes listed on the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) between 1997 and 2010 (n = 85,547) by linking the NDSS to the National Death Index. The Chiang method was used to estimate life expectancy and Arriaga’s method was used to estimate the contributions of age-specific and cause-specific mortality to the YLL. Results: A total of 5,981 deaths were identified during the 902,136 person-years of follow up. Type 1 diabetic patients had an estimated life expectancy at birth of 68.6 years (95% CI 68.1, 69.1), which was 12.2 years (95% CI 11.8, 12.7) less than that in the general population. The improvement in life expectancy at birth in 2004–2010 compared with 1997–2003 was similar for both type 1 diabetic patients (men, 1.9 years [95% CI 0.4, 3.3]; women, 1.5 years [95% CI 0.0, 3.2]) and the general population (men, 2.2 years; women, 1.4 years). Deaths at age <60 years accounted for 60% of the YLL from type 1 diabetes for men and 45% for women. The major contribution to YLL was mortality from endocrine and metabolic disease at age 10–39 years (men, 39–59%; women, 35–50%) and from circulatory disease at age ≥40 years (men, 43–75%; women, 34–75%). Conclusions/interpretation: Data from 1997 to 2010 showed that Australian type 1 diabetic patients had an estimated loss in life expectancy at birth of 12.2 years compared with the general population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1177-1185
Number of pages9
JournalDiabetologia
Volume59
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2016

Keywords

  • Life expectancy
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Years of life lost

Cite this

@article{0968e640948f49229a51a63c29be021d,
title = "Life expectancy of type 1 diabetic patients during 1997–2010: A national Australian registry-based cohort study",
abstract = "Aims/hypothesis: There is limited information about the impact of type 1 diabetes on life expectancy in a contemporary population. We examined the life expectancy of type 1 diabetic patients and explored the contribution of mortality at different ages and of different causes of death to years of life lost (YLL) compared with the general population. Methods: We derived mortality rates of Australians with type 1 diabetes listed on the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) between 1997 and 2010 (n = 85,547) by linking the NDSS to the National Death Index. The Chiang method was used to estimate life expectancy and Arriaga’s method was used to estimate the contributions of age-specific and cause-specific mortality to the YLL. Results: A total of 5,981 deaths were identified during the 902,136 person-years of follow up. Type 1 diabetic patients had an estimated life expectancy at birth of 68.6 years (95{\%} CI 68.1, 69.1), which was 12.2 years (95{\%} CI 11.8, 12.7) less than that in the general population. The improvement in life expectancy at birth in 2004–2010 compared with 1997–2003 was similar for both type 1 diabetic patients (men, 1.9 years [95{\%} CI 0.4, 3.3]; women, 1.5 years [95{\%} CI 0.0, 3.2]) and the general population (men, 2.2 years; women, 1.4 years). Deaths at age <60 years accounted for 60{\%} of the YLL from type 1 diabetes for men and 45{\%} for women. The major contribution to YLL was mortality from endocrine and metabolic disease at age 10–39 years (men, 39–59{\%}; women, 35–50{\%}) and from circulatory disease at age ≥40 years (men, 43–75{\%}; women, 34–75{\%}). Conclusions/interpretation: Data from 1997 to 2010 showed that Australian type 1 diabetic patients had an estimated loss in life expectancy at birth of 12.2 years compared with the general population.",
keywords = "Life expectancy, Type 1 diabetes, Years of life lost",
author = "Lili Huo and Harding, {Jessica L.} and Anna Peeters and Shaw, {Jonathan E.} and Magliano, {Dianna J.}",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1007/s00125-015-3857-4",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "1177--1185",
journal = "Diabetologia",
issn = "0012-186X",
publisher = "Springer-Verlag London Ltd.",
number = "6",

}

Life expectancy of type 1 diabetic patients during 1997–2010 : A national Australian registry-based cohort study. / Huo, Lili; Harding, Jessica L.; Peeters, Anna; Shaw, Jonathan E.; Magliano, Dianna J.

In: Diabetologia, Vol. 59, No. 6, 06.2016, p. 1177-1185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Life expectancy of type 1 diabetic patients during 1997–2010

T2 - A national Australian registry-based cohort study

AU - Huo, Lili

AU - Harding, Jessica L.

AU - Peeters, Anna

AU - Shaw, Jonathan E.

AU - Magliano, Dianna J.

PY - 2016/6

Y1 - 2016/6

N2 - Aims/hypothesis: There is limited information about the impact of type 1 diabetes on life expectancy in a contemporary population. We examined the life expectancy of type 1 diabetic patients and explored the contribution of mortality at different ages and of different causes of death to years of life lost (YLL) compared with the general population. Methods: We derived mortality rates of Australians with type 1 diabetes listed on the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) between 1997 and 2010 (n = 85,547) by linking the NDSS to the National Death Index. The Chiang method was used to estimate life expectancy and Arriaga’s method was used to estimate the contributions of age-specific and cause-specific mortality to the YLL. Results: A total of 5,981 deaths were identified during the 902,136 person-years of follow up. Type 1 diabetic patients had an estimated life expectancy at birth of 68.6 years (95% CI 68.1, 69.1), which was 12.2 years (95% CI 11.8, 12.7) less than that in the general population. The improvement in life expectancy at birth in 2004–2010 compared with 1997–2003 was similar for both type 1 diabetic patients (men, 1.9 years [95% CI 0.4, 3.3]; women, 1.5 years [95% CI 0.0, 3.2]) and the general population (men, 2.2 years; women, 1.4 years). Deaths at age <60 years accounted for 60% of the YLL from type 1 diabetes for men and 45% for women. The major contribution to YLL was mortality from endocrine and metabolic disease at age 10–39 years (men, 39–59%; women, 35–50%) and from circulatory disease at age ≥40 years (men, 43–75%; women, 34–75%). Conclusions/interpretation: Data from 1997 to 2010 showed that Australian type 1 diabetic patients had an estimated loss in life expectancy at birth of 12.2 years compared with the general population.

AB - Aims/hypothesis: There is limited information about the impact of type 1 diabetes on life expectancy in a contemporary population. We examined the life expectancy of type 1 diabetic patients and explored the contribution of mortality at different ages and of different causes of death to years of life lost (YLL) compared with the general population. Methods: We derived mortality rates of Australians with type 1 diabetes listed on the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) between 1997 and 2010 (n = 85,547) by linking the NDSS to the National Death Index. The Chiang method was used to estimate life expectancy and Arriaga’s method was used to estimate the contributions of age-specific and cause-specific mortality to the YLL. Results: A total of 5,981 deaths were identified during the 902,136 person-years of follow up. Type 1 diabetic patients had an estimated life expectancy at birth of 68.6 years (95% CI 68.1, 69.1), which was 12.2 years (95% CI 11.8, 12.7) less than that in the general population. The improvement in life expectancy at birth in 2004–2010 compared with 1997–2003 was similar for both type 1 diabetic patients (men, 1.9 years [95% CI 0.4, 3.3]; women, 1.5 years [95% CI 0.0, 3.2]) and the general population (men, 2.2 years; women, 1.4 years). Deaths at age <60 years accounted for 60% of the YLL from type 1 diabetes for men and 45% for women. The major contribution to YLL was mortality from endocrine and metabolic disease at age 10–39 years (men, 39–59%; women, 35–50%) and from circulatory disease at age ≥40 years (men, 43–75%; women, 34–75%). Conclusions/interpretation: Data from 1997 to 2010 showed that Australian type 1 diabetic patients had an estimated loss in life expectancy at birth of 12.2 years compared with the general population.

KW - Life expectancy

KW - Type 1 diabetes

KW - Years of life lost

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84955278833&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00125-015-3857-4

DO - 10.1007/s00125-015-3857-4

M3 - Article

VL - 59

SP - 1177

EP - 1185

JO - Diabetologia

JF - Diabetologia

SN - 0012-186X

IS - 6

ER -