Lethal giant larvae 1 tumour suppressor activity is not conserved in models of mammalian T and B cell leukaemia

Edwin Hawkins, Jane Oliaro, Kelly M Ramsbottom, Stephen Bek Ngie Ting, Faruk Sacirbegovic, Michael Harvey, Tanja Kinwell, Jacques Ghysdael, Ricky W Johnstone, Patrick O Humbert, Sarah May Russell

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14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In epithelial and stem cells, lethal giant larvae (Lgl) is a potent tumour suppressor, a regulator of Notch signalling, and a mediator of cell fate via asymmetric cell division. Recent evidence suggests that the function of Lgl is conserved in mammalian haematopoietic stem cells and implies a contribution to haematological malignancies. To date, direct measurement of the effect of Lgl expression on malignancies of the haematopoietic lineage has not been tested. In Lgl1-/- mice, we analysed the development of haematopoietic malignancies either alone, or in the presence of common oncogenic lesions. We show that in the absence of Lgl1, production of mature white blood cell lineages and long-term survival of mice are not affected. Additionally, loss of Lgl1 does not alter leukaemia driven by constitutive Notch, c-Myc or Jak2 signalling. These results suggest that the role of Lgl1 in the haematopoietic lineage might be restricted to specific co-operating mutations and a limited number of cellular contexts. ? 2014 Hawkins et al.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1 - 5
Number of pages5
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume9
Issue number1 (Art. No.: e87376)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

Hawkins, E., Oliaro, J., Ramsbottom, K. M., Ting, S. B. N., Sacirbegovic, F., Harvey, M., Kinwell, T., Ghysdael, J., Johnstone, R. W., Humbert, P. O., & Russell, S. M. (2014). Lethal giant larvae 1 tumour suppressor activity is not conserved in models of mammalian T and B cell leukaemia. PLoS ONE, 9(1 (Art. No.: e87376)), 1 - 5. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0087376