Learning the game: a creative approach to mHealth informatics in medical education

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractOtherpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction:
Literature reviews indicate a scarcity of mHealth curricula in undergraduate medical education despite professional guidelines and clinical use. Graduates are evidently not well prepared for mHealth informatics practice during University study. A crowded medical education curriculum creates challenges for the addition of this content.

Methodology:
This case study explores the development and delivery of an mHealth elective component piloted for fifteen first year undergraduate medical students at Monash University
(Australia). It also reports lessons learned by elective designers.

Results:
The medical students were not as technically savvy using mHealth practice tools as the literature had predicted. Ongoing educator self-reflection effectively refreshed program design “on the run” Expert speakers using mHealth for practice perceptibly engaged students. Forcefield analysis was a useful basis for devising mHealth practice evaluative tools. Combining small and large group discussions promoted student engagement with new concepts and associatedjargon. Group work by students outside of the elective improved their analyses. Assessment by mHealth informatics champions supported the students’ independent learning.

Lessons learned:
Educators with particular mHealth informatics and educational expertise are required to support mHealth pedagogies. Practical concerns, such as device ownership and free app shortages, hampered delivery of the elective. Technological jargon required clarification. The learning from our study has informed key elements of the medical students’ curriculum. It has established fundamental informatics concepts into the curriculum, helping prepare graduates for evolving mHealth practice horizons.
Original languageEnglish
Pages21
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 20 Oct 2015

Keywords

  • curriculum innovation
  • work integrated learning
  • health informatics education
  • medical education
  • professional education
  • telehealth
  • telemedicine

Cite this

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title = "Learning the game: a creative approach to mHealth informatics in medical education",
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Learning the game: a creative approach to mHealth informatics in medical education. / Lindley, Jennifer; Fernando, Juanita.

2015. 21.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractOtherpeer-review

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