Late Cenozoic plant extinctions in Australia

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

    19 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Late Cenozoic plant record for Australia is extremely patchy. Data indicate a general change in the continent's vegetation from complex rainforest to structurally more simple communities with a reduction in species diversity. Traditional ideas of a direct replacement of rainforest by eucalypt vegetation are challenged in light of recent fossil evidence. Complex rainforest was probably first replaced by a variety of open sclerophyll and drier rainforest communities in response to increasing aridity and climatic variability. Vegetation was probably not a critical factor in causing mammalian extinctions. -after Author

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationQuaternary extinctions
    Pages691-707
    Number of pages17
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1984

    Cite this

    Kershaw, A. P. (1984). Late Cenozoic plant extinctions in Australia. In Quaternary extinctions (pp. 691-707)
    Kershaw, A. P. / Late Cenozoic plant extinctions in Australia. Quaternary extinctions. 1984. pp. 691-707
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    abstract = "Late Cenozoic plant record for Australia is extremely patchy. Data indicate a general change in the continent's vegetation from complex rainforest to structurally more simple communities with a reduction in species diversity. Traditional ideas of a direct replacement of rainforest by eucalypt vegetation are challenged in light of recent fossil evidence. Complex rainforest was probably first replaced by a variety of open sclerophyll and drier rainforest communities in response to increasing aridity and climatic variability. Vegetation was probably not a critical factor in causing mammalian extinctions. -after Author",
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    Kershaw, AP 1984, Late Cenozoic plant extinctions in Australia. in Quaternary extinctions. pp. 691-707.

    Late Cenozoic plant extinctions in Australia. / Kershaw, A. P.

    Quaternary extinctions. 1984. p. 691-707.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

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    AB - Late Cenozoic plant record for Australia is extremely patchy. Data indicate a general change in the continent's vegetation from complex rainforest to structurally more simple communities with a reduction in species diversity. Traditional ideas of a direct replacement of rainforest by eucalypt vegetation are challenged in light of recent fossil evidence. Complex rainforest was probably first replaced by a variety of open sclerophyll and drier rainforest communities in response to increasing aridity and climatic variability. Vegetation was probably not a critical factor in causing mammalian extinctions. -after Author

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    Kershaw AP. Late Cenozoic plant extinctions in Australia. In Quaternary extinctions. 1984. p. 691-707