Klüver-Bucy Syndrome Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Synthesis and Review of Pharmacological Treatment From Cases in Adolescents and Adults

Fiona J. Clay, Anu Kuriakose, Dorothea Lesche, Amelia J. Hicks, Hadar Zaman, Elham Azizi, Jennie L. Ponsford, Mahesh Jayaram, Malcolm Hopwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Klüver-Bucy syndrome (KBS) is a rare clinical presentation following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Symptoms include visual agnosia, placidity, hyperorality, sexual hyperactivity, changes in dietary behavior, and hypermetamorphosis. The purpose of this article was to identify and synthesize the available evidence from case reports and case series on the treatment profile of KBS among adolescents and adults after TBI. Four bibliographic databases (MEDLINE OVID, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and SCOPUS) were searched for relevant literature. No date or language restrictions were applied. All case reports containing original data on KBS following TBI among adolescents and adults were included. Articles were evaluated, and data were extracted according to predefined criteria. The literature search identified 24 case reports of KBS post-TBI published between 1968 and 2017. Most case subjects were male (70.1%), and the mean age at injury was 25.1 years (range, 13-67 years). Injury to one or both temporal lobes occurred in most cases. Inappropriate sexual hyperactivity was the most common KBS symptom, followed by a change in dietary behavior and hyperorality. Visual agnosia was the least reported. In 50% of cases, the patient fully recovered from KBS. One-half of all participants described pharmacological management; the most common medication prescribed was carbamazepine. Overall, there was a lack of data available on pharmacotherapy initiation and duration. The complex presentation of KBS presents challenges in terms of treatment options. Although overall individuals who were prescribed carbamazepine had positive outcomes, given the reliance on case reports, it is difficult to make a definitive recommendation to guide clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6-16
Number of pages11
JournalThe Journal of neuropsychiatry and clinical neurosciences
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2019

Keywords

  • Drug/Psychotherapy Treatment of Neuropsychiatric Disorders
  • Organic Mental Disorders
  • Traumatic Brain Injury

Cite this