Key informant perceptions of youth-focussed sexual health promotion programs in Australia

Danielle Newton, Louise Keogh, Meredith Temple-Smith, Christopher K Fairley, Marcus Y Chen, Christine Margaret Bayly, Henrietta Williams, Kathleen Margaret McNamee, Dorothy Henning, Arthur Hsueh, Jane Rosamond Woodward Fisher, Jane Hocking

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: To explore knowledge about the effects on fertility of age, obesity, smoking, and timing of intercourse among Australians of reproductive age.

DESIGN: Telephone survey of a representative sample of Australians.SETTING:Not applicable.

PATIENT(S): Australians aged 18 to 45 years who wish to have a child or another child now or in the future.

INTERVENTION(S): None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Knowledge about the effect on fertility of age, obesity, smoking, and timing of intercourse.

RESULT(S): A total of 462 interviews were conducted. The majority of respondents underestimated, by about 10 years, the age at which male and female fertility starts to decline. Only one in four correctly identified that female fertility starts to decline before age 35, and one in three identified that male fertility starts to decline before age 45. Most (59 ) were aware that female obesity and smoking affect fertility, but fewer recognized that male obesity (30 ) and smoking (36 ) also influence fertility. Almost 40 of respondents had inadequate knowledge of when in the menstrual cycle a woman is most likely to conceive.

CONCLUSION(S): Considerable knowledge gaps about modifiable factors that affect fertility were identified. These are targeted in a national education campaign to promote awareness of factors that influence fertility.Copyright ? 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47 - 56
Number of pages10
JournalSexual Health
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Cite this

Newton, Danielle ; Keogh, Louise ; Temple-Smith, Meredith ; Fairley, Christopher K ; Chen, Marcus Y ; Bayly, Christine Margaret ; Williams, Henrietta ; McNamee, Kathleen Margaret ; Henning, Dorothy ; Hsueh, Arthur ; Fisher, Jane Rosamond Woodward ; Hocking, Jane. / Key informant perceptions of youth-focussed sexual health promotion programs in Australia. In: Sexual Health. 2013 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 47 - 56.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: To explore knowledge about the effects on fertility of age, obesity, smoking, and timing of intercourse among Australians of reproductive age.DESIGN: Telephone survey of a representative sample of Australians.SETTING:Not applicable.PATIENT(S): Australians aged 18 to 45 years who wish to have a child or another child now or in the future.INTERVENTION(S): None.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Knowledge about the effect on fertility of age, obesity, smoking, and timing of intercourse.RESULT(S): A total of 462 interviews were conducted. The majority of respondents underestimated, by about 10 years, the age at which male and female fertility starts to decline. Only one in four correctly identified that female fertility starts to decline before age 35, and one in three identified that male fertility starts to decline before age 45. Most (59 ) were aware that female obesity and smoking affect fertility, but fewer recognized that male obesity (30 ) and smoking (36 ) also influence fertility. Almost 40 of respondents had inadequate knowledge of when in the menstrual cycle a woman is most likely to conceive.CONCLUSION(S): Considerable knowledge gaps about modifiable factors that affect fertility were identified. These are targeted in a national education campaign to promote awareness of factors that influence fertility.Copyright ? 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
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Newton, D, Keogh, L, Temple-Smith, M, Fairley, CK, Chen, MY, Bayly, CM, Williams, H, McNamee, KM, Henning, D, Hsueh, A, Fisher, JRW & Hocking, J 2013, 'Key informant perceptions of youth-focussed sexual health promotion programs in Australia', Sexual Health, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 47 - 56. https://doi.org/10.1071/SH12046

Key informant perceptions of youth-focussed sexual health promotion programs in Australia. / Newton, Danielle; Keogh, Louise; Temple-Smith, Meredith; Fairley, Christopher K; Chen, Marcus Y; Bayly, Christine Margaret; Williams, Henrietta; McNamee, Kathleen Margaret; Henning, Dorothy; Hsueh, Arthur; Fisher, Jane Rosamond Woodward; Hocking, Jane.

In: Sexual Health, Vol. 10, No. 1, 2013, p. 47 - 56.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Bayly, Christine Margaret

AU - Williams, Henrietta

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AU - Fisher, Jane Rosamond Woodward

AU - Hocking, Jane

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N2 - BACKGROUND: To explore knowledge about the effects on fertility of age, obesity, smoking, and timing of intercourse among Australians of reproductive age.DESIGN: Telephone survey of a representative sample of Australians.SETTING:Not applicable.PATIENT(S): Australians aged 18 to 45 years who wish to have a child or another child now or in the future.INTERVENTION(S): None.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Knowledge about the effect on fertility of age, obesity, smoking, and timing of intercourse.RESULT(S): A total of 462 interviews were conducted. The majority of respondents underestimated, by about 10 years, the age at which male and female fertility starts to decline. Only one in four correctly identified that female fertility starts to decline before age 35, and one in three identified that male fertility starts to decline before age 45. Most (59 ) were aware that female obesity and smoking affect fertility, but fewer recognized that male obesity (30 ) and smoking (36 ) also influence fertility. Almost 40 of respondents had inadequate knowledge of when in the menstrual cycle a woman is most likely to conceive.CONCLUSION(S): Considerable knowledge gaps about modifiable factors that affect fertility were identified. These are targeted in a national education campaign to promote awareness of factors that influence fertility.Copyright ? 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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