Keeping up: A dilemma for science teachers

John Loughran, Lawrence Ingvarson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This paper is based on interviews with seventy-five science teachers in twelve schools across Australia. The interviews were conducted as part of a D.E.E.T. Project of National Significance. The purpose of the project was to develop a strategy for the professional development of science teachers. The main purpose of our interviews was to listen to teachers' views on what such a strategy should try to achieve. We asked them to talk about conditions affecting the quality of their work, their attitudes to teaching, their professional development, their careers, the evaluation of teaching, and Award Restructuring. Through these interviews we came to understand how many science teachers are loosely connected with potentially valuable sources of support for their professional development. In this paper we focus on one group of "loose connections"; those between science teachers and scientists in other fields, research in science education, and their colleagues within science departments in schools.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)234-243
Number of pages10
JournalResearch in Science Education
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 1991

Cite this

Loughran, John ; Ingvarson, Lawrence. / Keeping up : A dilemma for science teachers. In: Research in Science Education. 1991 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 234-243.
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Keeping up : A dilemma for science teachers. / Loughran, John; Ingvarson, Lawrence.

In: Research in Science Education, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.12.1991, p. 234-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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