Invited commentary

Assessment of air pollution and suicide risk

Yuming Guo, Adrian G. Barnett

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleOtherpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Suicide is a serious public health issue worldwide, with multiple risk factors, such as severe mental illness, alcohol abuse, a painful loss, exposure to violence, or social isolation. Environmental factors, particularly chemical and meteorological variables, have been examined as risk factors for suicide, but less evidence is available on whether air pollution is related to suicide. In this issue of the Journal, Bakian et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2015;181(5):295-303) publish findings from a study that found a short-term increased risk of suicide associated with increased air pollution. This study bolsters a small body of research linking air pollution exposure to suicide risk. If the association between air pollution and suicide is confirmed, it would broaden the scope of the already large disease burden associated with air pollution.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)304-308
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume181
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Feb 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • air pollution
  • case-crossover studies
  • confounding
  • exposure measurement
  • measurement error
  • selection bias
  • suicide

Cite this

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Invited commentary : Assessment of air pollution and suicide risk. / Guo, Yuming; Barnett, Adrian G.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 181, No. 5, 10.02.2015, p. 304-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleOtherpeer-review

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