Investigating Differences Between Drugs Used in the Australian Night-Time Economy: Demographics, Substance Use, and Harm

Amy Pennay, Rebecca Jenkinson, Brendan Quinn, Nicolas Tom Droste, Amy Peacock, Daniel Ian Lubman, Peter G Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Understanding the characteristics of drug users in the night-time economy (NTE), and whether particular drugs are associated with risky practices and experience of harm, is necessary to inform targeted policy responses in this context. Objectives: To investigate the correlates of drugs used in the Australian NTE relating to demographics, alcohol use, and experience of harm. Methods: Patrons were interviewed in the NTE of five Australian cities in 2012–2013 (n = 7,028; 61.9% male, median age 22 years). A custom designed survey gathered demographic data, alcohol, and substance use on the current night, and experience of harm in/around licensed venues in the past 3 months. Multivariate logistic regression analyses examined the correlates of drug use. Results: Ecstasy was most commonly reported (4.0%), followed by cannabis (2.9%), methamphetamine (2.6%), and cocaine (1.6%). Ecstasy users were more likely to be younger and report energy drink consumption. Cannabis users were more likely to be male, and to have been involved in intoxication-related accidents/injuries and sexual aggression in/around licensed venues in the past 3 months. Methamphetamine users were more likely to have been interviewed later, and to have engaged in pre-drinking. Cocaine users were more likely to be male, aged 21 years or more, have a blood alcohol concentration of greater than 0.10%, and to have been involved in intoxication-related accidents/injuries in the past three months. Conclusions/Importance: We identified significant differences between types of drug users and the harms they experience, underscoring the need to develop innovative harm reduction policies in the NTE rather than blanket population-based approaches.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-81
Number of pages11
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jan 2017

Keywords

  • Australia
  • cannabis
  • cocaine
  • ecstasy
  • methamphetamine
  • night-time economy

Cite this

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title = "Investigating Differences Between Drugs Used in the Australian Night-Time Economy: Demographics, Substance Use, and Harm",
abstract = "Background: Understanding the characteristics of drug users in the night-time economy (NTE), and whether particular drugs are associated with risky practices and experience of harm, is necessary to inform targeted policy responses in this context. Objectives: To investigate the correlates of drugs used in the Australian NTE relating to demographics, alcohol use, and experience of harm. Methods: Patrons were interviewed in the NTE of five Australian cities in 2012–2013 (n = 7,028; 61.9{\%} male, median age 22 years). A custom designed survey gathered demographic data, alcohol, and substance use on the current night, and experience of harm in/around licensed venues in the past 3 months. Multivariate logistic regression analyses examined the correlates of drug use. Results: Ecstasy was most commonly reported (4.0{\%}), followed by cannabis (2.9{\%}), methamphetamine (2.6{\%}), and cocaine (1.6{\%}). Ecstasy users were more likely to be younger and report energy drink consumption. Cannabis users were more likely to be male, and to have been involved in intoxication-related accidents/injuries and sexual aggression in/around licensed venues in the past 3 months. Methamphetamine users were more likely to have been interviewed later, and to have engaged in pre-drinking. Cocaine users were more likely to be male, aged 21 years or more, have a blood alcohol concentration of greater than 0.10{\%}, and to have been involved in intoxication-related accidents/injuries in the past three months. Conclusions/Importance: We identified significant differences between types of drug users and the harms they experience, underscoring the need to develop innovative harm reduction policies in the NTE rather than blanket population-based approaches.",
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Investigating Differences Between Drugs Used in the Australian Night-Time Economy : Demographics, Substance Use, and Harm. / Pennay, Amy; Jenkinson, Rebecca; Quinn, Brendan; Droste, Nicolas Tom; Peacock, Amy; Lubman, Daniel Ian; Miller, Peter G.

In: Substance Use and Misuse, Vol. 52, No. 1, 02.01.2017, p. 71-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Investigating Differences Between Drugs Used in the Australian Night-Time Economy

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AU - Jenkinson, Rebecca

AU - Quinn, Brendan

AU - Droste, Nicolas Tom

AU - Peacock, Amy

AU - Lubman, Daniel Ian

AU - Miller, Peter G

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N2 - Background: Understanding the characteristics of drug users in the night-time economy (NTE), and whether particular drugs are associated with risky practices and experience of harm, is necessary to inform targeted policy responses in this context. Objectives: To investigate the correlates of drugs used in the Australian NTE relating to demographics, alcohol use, and experience of harm. Methods: Patrons were interviewed in the NTE of five Australian cities in 2012–2013 (n = 7,028; 61.9% male, median age 22 years). A custom designed survey gathered demographic data, alcohol, and substance use on the current night, and experience of harm in/around licensed venues in the past 3 months. Multivariate logistic regression analyses examined the correlates of drug use. Results: Ecstasy was most commonly reported (4.0%), followed by cannabis (2.9%), methamphetamine (2.6%), and cocaine (1.6%). Ecstasy users were more likely to be younger and report energy drink consumption. Cannabis users were more likely to be male, and to have been involved in intoxication-related accidents/injuries and sexual aggression in/around licensed venues in the past 3 months. Methamphetamine users were more likely to have been interviewed later, and to have engaged in pre-drinking. Cocaine users were more likely to be male, aged 21 years or more, have a blood alcohol concentration of greater than 0.10%, and to have been involved in intoxication-related accidents/injuries in the past three months. Conclusions/Importance: We identified significant differences between types of drug users and the harms they experience, underscoring the need to develop innovative harm reduction policies in the NTE rather than blanket population-based approaches.

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