Internet-based trials and the creation of health consumers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper we document the experience of participating in novel randomised controlled trials for panic disorder - where face-to-face and Internet delivery of cognitive behavioural therapy are compared. Our analysis is based on 18 months of observation and in-depth interviews with 10 trial participants and 8 trialists in Victoria, Australia. We argue that the participants are positioned as active health consumers and approach the trial as they would other self-help practices. High levels of individual responsibility are assumed of participants in these trials, which they accept by approaching the trials reflexively and searching for information and strategies they can employ while building their health literacy on panic disorder. Although the researchers set the parameters of the treatment and interaction, increasingly the participants choose the extent to which they will comply with their defined role. For the participants the trial is one of the pick and mix options of available treatment and we suggest it is a compelling example of contemporary health consumption. ? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)485 - 492
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume70
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Cite this

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title = "Internet-based trials and the creation of health consumers",
abstract = "In this paper we document the experience of participating in novel randomised controlled trials for panic disorder - where face-to-face and Internet delivery of cognitive behavioural therapy are compared. Our analysis is based on 18 months of observation and in-depth interviews with 10 trial participants and 8 trialists in Victoria, Australia. We argue that the participants are positioned as active health consumers and approach the trial as they would other self-help practices. High levels of individual responsibility are assumed of participants in these trials, which they accept by approaching the trials reflexively and searching for information and strategies they can employ while building their health literacy on panic disorder. Although the researchers set the parameters of the treatment and interaction, increasingly the participants choose the extent to which they will comply with their defined role. For the participants the trial is one of the pick and mix options of available treatment and we suggest it is a compelling example of contemporary health consumption. ? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
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Internet-based trials and the creation of health consumers. / Advocat, Jenny; Lindsay, Joanne.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 70, No. 3, 2010, p. 485 - 492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Internet-based trials and the creation of health consumers

AU - Advocat, Jenny

AU - Lindsay, Joanne

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

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AB - In this paper we document the experience of participating in novel randomised controlled trials for panic disorder - where face-to-face and Internet delivery of cognitive behavioural therapy are compared. Our analysis is based on 18 months of observation and in-depth interviews with 10 trial participants and 8 trialists in Victoria, Australia. We argue that the participants are positioned as active health consumers and approach the trial as they would other self-help practices. High levels of individual responsibility are assumed of participants in these trials, which they accept by approaching the trials reflexively and searching for information and strategies they can employ while building their health literacy on panic disorder. Although the researchers set the parameters of the treatment and interaction, increasingly the participants choose the extent to which they will comply with their defined role. For the participants the trial is one of the pick and mix options of available treatment and we suggest it is a compelling example of contemporary health consumption. ? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

UR - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19926185

U2 - 10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.10.051

DO - 10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.10.051

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EP - 492

JO - Social Science and Medicine

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