Information management for aged care provision in Australia

Development of an aged care minimum dataset and strategies to improve quality and continuity of care

Jenny Davis, Amee Morgans, Stephen Burgess

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Efficient information systems support the provision of multi-disciplinary aged care and a variety of organisational
purposes, including quality, funding, communication and continuity of care. Agreed minimum data sets enable
accurate communication across multiple care settings. However, in aged care multiple and poorly integrated data collection
frameworks are commonly used for client assessment, government reporting and funding purposes. Objective: To
determine key information needs in aged care settings to improve information quality, information transfer, safety, quality
and continuity of care to meet the complex needs of aged care clients. Method: Modified Delphi methods involving five
stages were employed by one aged care provider in Victoria, Australia, to establish stakeholder consensus for a derived
minimum data set and address barriers to data quality. Results: Eleven different aged care programs were identified; with
five related data dictionaries, three minimum data sets, five program standards or quality frameworks. The remaining data
collection frameworks related to diseases classification, funding, service activity reporting, and statistical standards and
classifications. A total of 170 different data items collected across seven internal information systems were consolidated to a
derived set of 60 core data items and aligned with nationally consistent data collection frameworks. Barriers to data quality
related to inconsistencies in data items, staff knowledge, workflow, system access and configuration. Conclusion: The
development an internal aged care minimum data set highlighted the critical role of primary data quality in the upstream
and downstream use of client information; and presents a platform to build national consistency across the sector.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-35
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Information Management Journal
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Health Information Systems
  • Data Collection
  • Datasets as Topic
  • Aged
  • Australia

Cite this

@article{582acdd124d3450a8ed9b57737857f16,
title = "Information management for aged care provision in Australia: Development of an aged care minimum dataset and strategies to improve quality and continuity of care",
abstract = "Background: Efficient information systems support the provision of multi-disciplinary aged care and a variety of organisationalpurposes, including quality, funding, communication and continuity of care. Agreed minimum data sets enableaccurate communication across multiple care settings. However, in aged care multiple and poorly integrated data collectionframeworks are commonly used for client assessment, government reporting and funding purposes. Objective: Todetermine key information needs in aged care settings to improve information quality, information transfer, safety, qualityand continuity of care to meet the complex needs of aged care clients. Method: Modified Delphi methods involving fivestages were employed by one aged care provider in Victoria, Australia, to establish stakeholder consensus for a derivedminimum data set and address barriers to data quality. Results: Eleven different aged care programs were identified; withfive related data dictionaries, three minimum data sets, five program standards or quality frameworks. The remaining datacollection frameworks related to diseases classification, funding, service activity reporting, and statistical standards andclassifications. A total of 170 different data items collected across seven internal information systems were consolidated to aderived set of 60 core data items and aligned with nationally consistent data collection frameworks. Barriers to data qualityrelated to inconsistencies in data items, staff knowledge, workflow, system access and configuration. Conclusion: Thedevelopment an internal aged care minimum data set highlighted the critical role of primary data quality in the upstreamand downstream use of client information; and presents a platform to build national consistency across the sector.",
keywords = "Health Information Systems, Data Collection, Datasets as Topic, Aged, Australia",
author = "Jenny Davis and Amee Morgans and Stephen Burgess",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1177/1833358316639453",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "27--35",
journal = "Health Information Management Journal",
issn = "1833-3583",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "1",

}

Information management for aged care provision in Australia : Development of an aged care minimum dataset and strategies to improve quality and continuity of care. / Davis, Jenny; Morgans, Amee; Burgess, Stephen.

In: Health Information Management Journal, Vol. 45, No. 1, 2016, p. 27-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Information management for aged care provision in Australia

T2 - Development of an aged care minimum dataset and strategies to improve quality and continuity of care

AU - Davis, Jenny

AU - Morgans, Amee

AU - Burgess, Stephen

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Background: Efficient information systems support the provision of multi-disciplinary aged care and a variety of organisationalpurposes, including quality, funding, communication and continuity of care. Agreed minimum data sets enableaccurate communication across multiple care settings. However, in aged care multiple and poorly integrated data collectionframeworks are commonly used for client assessment, government reporting and funding purposes. Objective: Todetermine key information needs in aged care settings to improve information quality, information transfer, safety, qualityand continuity of care to meet the complex needs of aged care clients. Method: Modified Delphi methods involving fivestages were employed by one aged care provider in Victoria, Australia, to establish stakeholder consensus for a derivedminimum data set and address barriers to data quality. Results: Eleven different aged care programs were identified; withfive related data dictionaries, three minimum data sets, five program standards or quality frameworks. The remaining datacollection frameworks related to diseases classification, funding, service activity reporting, and statistical standards andclassifications. A total of 170 different data items collected across seven internal information systems were consolidated to aderived set of 60 core data items and aligned with nationally consistent data collection frameworks. Barriers to data qualityrelated to inconsistencies in data items, staff knowledge, workflow, system access and configuration. Conclusion: Thedevelopment an internal aged care minimum data set highlighted the critical role of primary data quality in the upstreamand downstream use of client information; and presents a platform to build national consistency across the sector.

AB - Background: Efficient information systems support the provision of multi-disciplinary aged care and a variety of organisationalpurposes, including quality, funding, communication and continuity of care. Agreed minimum data sets enableaccurate communication across multiple care settings. However, in aged care multiple and poorly integrated data collectionframeworks are commonly used for client assessment, government reporting and funding purposes. Objective: Todetermine key information needs in aged care settings to improve information quality, information transfer, safety, qualityand continuity of care to meet the complex needs of aged care clients. Method: Modified Delphi methods involving fivestages were employed by one aged care provider in Victoria, Australia, to establish stakeholder consensus for a derivedminimum data set and address barriers to data quality. Results: Eleven different aged care programs were identified; withfive related data dictionaries, three minimum data sets, five program standards or quality frameworks. The remaining datacollection frameworks related to diseases classification, funding, service activity reporting, and statistical standards andclassifications. A total of 170 different data items collected across seven internal information systems were consolidated to aderived set of 60 core data items and aligned with nationally consistent data collection frameworks. Barriers to data qualityrelated to inconsistencies in data items, staff knowledge, workflow, system access and configuration. Conclusion: Thedevelopment an internal aged care minimum data set highlighted the critical role of primary data quality in the upstreamand downstream use of client information; and presents a platform to build national consistency across the sector.

KW - Health Information Systems

KW - Data Collection

KW - Datasets as Topic

KW - Aged

KW - Australia

UR - http://himaa2.org.au/HIMJ/?q=onlinefirst

U2 - 10.1177/1833358316639453

DO - 10.1177/1833358316639453

M3 - Article

VL - 45

SP - 27

EP - 35

JO - Health Information Management Journal

JF - Health Information Management Journal

SN - 1833-3583

IS - 1

ER -