Influence of sprint training on human skeletal muscle purine nucleotide metabolism

C. G. Stathis, M. A. Febbraio, M. F. Carey, R. J. Snow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

122 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To examine the effect of sprint training on human skeletal muscle purine nucleotide metabolism, eight active untrained subjects completed a maximal 30-s sprint bout on a cycle ergometer before and after 7 wk of sprint training. Resting muscle ATP and total adenine nucleotide content were reduced (P < 0.05) by 19 and 18%, respectively, after training. Training resulted in a 52% attenuation (P < 0.05) in the magnitude of ATP depletion after exercise and a similar reduction (P < 0.05) in the accumulation of inosine 5'-monophosphate and ammonia. During recovery, muscle inosine 5'- monophosphate (P < 0.05) and inosine (P < 0.01) content were reduced after training, as was the accumulation of inosine (P < 0.05). Plasma ammonia was higher (P < 0.05) after training early in recovery; in contrast, plasma hypoxanthine concentrations were reduced (P < 0.05) during the latter stages of recovery. The attenuated resting ATP and total adenine nucleotide contents after training probably result from the acute effects of prior training sessions. The reduction in the magnitude of ATP depletion during a 30-s sprint bout after training must reflect an improved balance between ATP hydrolysis and resynthesis. It is unclear which mechanism(s) is responsible for the reduction in the magnitude of ATP degradation after training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1802-1809
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume76
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1994
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • adenine nucleotides
  • adenosine 5'-triphosphate
  • ammonia
  • anaerobic exercise
  • anaerobic training
  • hypoxanthine
  • inosine 5'- monophosphate
  • muscle metabolism
  • recovery

Cite this