Influence of food, body size, and fragmentation on metabolic rate in a sessile marine invertebrate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Metabolic rates vary among individuals according to food availability and phenotype, most notably body size. Disentangling size from other factors (e.g., age, reproductive status) can be difficult in some groups, but modular organisms may provide an opportunity for manipulating size experimentally. While modular organisms are increasingly used to understand metabolic scaling, the potential of feeding to alter metabolic scaling has not been explored in this group. Here, we perform a series of experiments to examine the drivers of metabolic rate in a modular marine invertebrate, the bryozoan Bugula neritina. We manipulated size and examined metabolic rate in either fed or starved individuals to test for interactions between size manipulation and food availability. Field collected colonies of unknown age showed isometric metabolic scaling, but those colonies in which size was manipulated showed allometric scaling. To further disentangle age effects from size effects, we measured metabolic rate of individuals of known age and again found allometric scaling. Metabolic rate strongly depended on access to food: starvation decreased metabolic rate by 20% and feeding increased metabolic rate by 43%. In comparison to other marine invertebrates, however, the increase in metabolic rate, as well as the duration of the increase (known as specific dynamic action, SDA), were both low. Importantly, neither starvation nor feeding altered the metabolic scaling of our colonies. Overall, we found that field-collected individuals showed isometric metabolic scaling, whereas metabolic rate of size-manipulated colonies scaled allometrically with body size. Thus, metabolic scaling is affected by size manipulation but not feeding in this colonial marine invertebrate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-66
Number of pages12
JournalInvertebrate Biology
Volume138
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • bryozoan
  • fragmentation
  • metabolic scaling
  • modularity
  • specific dynamic action

Cite this

@article{d36a357ce06f418a968b5aba148d3a5f,
title = "Influence of food, body size, and fragmentation on metabolic rate in a sessile marine invertebrate",
abstract = "Metabolic rates vary among individuals according to food availability and phenotype, most notably body size. Disentangling size from other factors (e.g., age, reproductive status) can be difficult in some groups, but modular organisms may provide an opportunity for manipulating size experimentally. While modular organisms are increasingly used to understand metabolic scaling, the potential of feeding to alter metabolic scaling has not been explored in this group. Here, we perform a series of experiments to examine the drivers of metabolic rate in a modular marine invertebrate, the bryozoan Bugula neritina. We manipulated size and examined metabolic rate in either fed or starved individuals to test for interactions between size manipulation and food availability. Field collected colonies of unknown age showed isometric metabolic scaling, but those colonies in which size was manipulated showed allometric scaling. To further disentangle age effects from size effects, we measured metabolic rate of individuals of known age and again found allometric scaling. Metabolic rate strongly depended on access to food: starvation decreased metabolic rate by 20{\%} and feeding increased metabolic rate by 43{\%}. In comparison to other marine invertebrates, however, the increase in metabolic rate, as well as the duration of the increase (known as specific dynamic action, SDA), were both low. Importantly, neither starvation nor feeding altered the metabolic scaling of our colonies. Overall, we found that field-collected individuals showed isometric metabolic scaling, whereas metabolic rate of size-manipulated colonies scaled allometrically with body size. Thus, metabolic scaling is affected by size manipulation but not feeding in this colonial marine invertebrate.",
keywords = "bryozoan, fragmentation, metabolic scaling, modularity, specific dynamic action",
author = "Lukas Schuster and White, {Craig R.} and Marshall, {Dustin J.}",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/ivb.12241",
language = "English",
volume = "138",
pages = "55--66",
journal = "Invertebrate Biology",
issn = "1077-8306",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

Influence of food, body size, and fragmentation on metabolic rate in a sessile marine invertebrate. / Schuster, Lukas; White, Craig R.; Marshall, Dustin J.

In: Invertebrate Biology, Vol. 138, No. 1, 01.03.2019, p. 55-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of food, body size, and fragmentation on metabolic rate in a sessile marine invertebrate

AU - Schuster, Lukas

AU - White, Craig R.

AU - Marshall, Dustin J.

PY - 2019/3/1

Y1 - 2019/3/1

N2 - Metabolic rates vary among individuals according to food availability and phenotype, most notably body size. Disentangling size from other factors (e.g., age, reproductive status) can be difficult in some groups, but modular organisms may provide an opportunity for manipulating size experimentally. While modular organisms are increasingly used to understand metabolic scaling, the potential of feeding to alter metabolic scaling has not been explored in this group. Here, we perform a series of experiments to examine the drivers of metabolic rate in a modular marine invertebrate, the bryozoan Bugula neritina. We manipulated size and examined metabolic rate in either fed or starved individuals to test for interactions between size manipulation and food availability. Field collected colonies of unknown age showed isometric metabolic scaling, but those colonies in which size was manipulated showed allometric scaling. To further disentangle age effects from size effects, we measured metabolic rate of individuals of known age and again found allometric scaling. Metabolic rate strongly depended on access to food: starvation decreased metabolic rate by 20% and feeding increased metabolic rate by 43%. In comparison to other marine invertebrates, however, the increase in metabolic rate, as well as the duration of the increase (known as specific dynamic action, SDA), were both low. Importantly, neither starvation nor feeding altered the metabolic scaling of our colonies. Overall, we found that field-collected individuals showed isometric metabolic scaling, whereas metabolic rate of size-manipulated colonies scaled allometrically with body size. Thus, metabolic scaling is affected by size manipulation but not feeding in this colonial marine invertebrate.

AB - Metabolic rates vary among individuals according to food availability and phenotype, most notably body size. Disentangling size from other factors (e.g., age, reproductive status) can be difficult in some groups, but modular organisms may provide an opportunity for manipulating size experimentally. While modular organisms are increasingly used to understand metabolic scaling, the potential of feeding to alter metabolic scaling has not been explored in this group. Here, we perform a series of experiments to examine the drivers of metabolic rate in a modular marine invertebrate, the bryozoan Bugula neritina. We manipulated size and examined metabolic rate in either fed or starved individuals to test for interactions between size manipulation and food availability. Field collected colonies of unknown age showed isometric metabolic scaling, but those colonies in which size was manipulated showed allometric scaling. To further disentangle age effects from size effects, we measured metabolic rate of individuals of known age and again found allometric scaling. Metabolic rate strongly depended on access to food: starvation decreased metabolic rate by 20% and feeding increased metabolic rate by 43%. In comparison to other marine invertebrates, however, the increase in metabolic rate, as well as the duration of the increase (known as specific dynamic action, SDA), were both low. Importantly, neither starvation nor feeding altered the metabolic scaling of our colonies. Overall, we found that field-collected individuals showed isometric metabolic scaling, whereas metabolic rate of size-manipulated colonies scaled allometrically with body size. Thus, metabolic scaling is affected by size manipulation but not feeding in this colonial marine invertebrate.

KW - bryozoan

KW - fragmentation

KW - metabolic scaling

KW - modularity

KW - specific dynamic action

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85062715560&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/ivb.12241

DO - 10.1111/ivb.12241

M3 - Article

VL - 138

SP - 55

EP - 66

JO - Invertebrate Biology

JF - Invertebrate Biology

SN - 1077-8306

IS - 1

ER -