Increased microglial activation in the rat brain following neonatal exposure to a bacterial mimetic

Luba Sominsky, A. K. Walker, L. K. Ong, R. J. Tynan, F. R. Walker, D M Hodgson

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48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neonatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure increases anxiety-like behaviour in adulthood. Our current aim was to examine whether neonatal LPS exposure is associated with changes in microglial activation, and whether these alterations correspond with alterations in behaviour. In adulthood, LPS-treated animals exhibited significantly increased anxiety-like behaviour and hippocampal microglial activation. The efficacy of the LPS challenge was confirmed by increased neonatal plasma corticosterone and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylation in the adrenal medulla. These findings suggest a neuroimmune pathway which may underpin the long-term behavioural and neuroendocrine changes following neonatal infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)351-356
Number of pages6
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume226
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anxiety behaviour
  • Hippocampus
  • HPA axis
  • LPS
  • Microglial activation
  • Postnatal
  • TH phosphorylation

Cite this

Sominsky, L., Walker, A. K., Ong, L. K., Tynan, R. J., Walker, F. R., & Hodgson, D. M. (2012). Increased microglial activation in the rat brain following neonatal exposure to a bacterial mimetic. Behavioural Brain Research, 226(1), 351-356. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2011.08.038