Impact of Trauma System Structure on Injury Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Lynne Moore, Howard Champion, Pier Alexandre Tardif, Brice Lionel Kuimi, Gerard O’Reilly, Ari Leppaniemi, Peter Cameron, Cameron S. Palmer, Fikri M. Abu-Zidan, Belinda Gabbe, Christine Gaarder, Natalie Yanchar, Henry Thomas Stelfox, Raul Coimbra, John Kortbeek, Vanessa K. Noonan, Amy Gunning, Malcolm Gordon, Monty Khajanchi, Teegwendé V. PorgoAlexis F. Turgeon, Luke Leenen, On behalf of the International Injury Care Improvement Initiative

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The effectiveness of trauma systems in decreasing injury mortality and morbidity has been well demonstrated. However, little is known about which components contribute to their effectiveness. We aimed to systematically review the evidence of the impact of trauma system components on clinically important injury outcomes. Methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and BIOSIS/Web of Knowledge, gray literature and trauma association Web sites to identify studies evaluating the association between at least one trauma system component and injury outcome. We calculated pooled effect estimates using inverse-variance random-effects models. We evaluated quality of evidence using GRADE criteria. Results: We screened 15,974 records, retaining 41 studies for qualitative synthesis and 19 for meta-analysis. Two recommended trauma system components were associated with reduced odds of mortality: inclusive design (odds ratio [OR] = 0.72 [0.65–0.80]) and helicopter transport (OR = 0.70 [0.55–0.88]). Pre-Hospital Advanced Trauma Life Support was associated with a significant reduction in hospital days (mean difference [MD] = 5.7 [4.4–7.0]) but a nonsignificant reduction in mortality (OR = 0.78 [0.44–1.39]). Population density of surgeons was associated with a nonsignificant decrease in mortality (MD = 0.58 [−0.22 to 1.39]). Trauma system maturity was associated with a significant reduction in mortality (OR = 0.76 [0.68–0.85]). Quality of evidence was low or very low for mortality and healthcare utilization. Conclusions: This review offers low-quality evidence for the effectiveness of an inclusive design and trauma system maturity and very-low-quality evidence for helicopter transport in reducing injury mortality. Further research should evaluate other recommended components of trauma systems and non-fatal outcomes and explore the impact of system component interactions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1327-1339
Number of pages13
JournalWorld Journal of Surgery
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2018

Cite this

Moore, L., Champion, H., Tardif, P. A., Kuimi, B. L., O’Reilly, G., Leppaniemi, A., Cameron, P., Palmer, C. S., Abu-Zidan, F. M., Gabbe, B., Gaarder, C., Yanchar, N., Stelfox, H. T., Coimbra, R., Kortbeek, J., Noonan, V. K., Gunning, A., Gordon, M., Khajanchi, M., ... On behalf of the International Injury Care Improvement Initiative (2018). Impact of Trauma System Structure on Injury Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. World Journal of Surgery, 42(5), 1327-1339. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00268-017-4292-0