Impact of antigen specificity on CD4+ T cell activation in chronic HIV-1 infection

Miranda Zoe Denham Smith, Sonia Bastidas, Urs Karrer, Annette Oxenius

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: HIV infection induces chronic immune activation which is associated with accelerated disease progression; the causes of this activation, however, are incompletely understood. We investigated the activation status of CD4+ T cells specific for chronic herpes viruses and the non-persistent antigen tetanus toxoid (TT) in HIV positive and HIV negative donors to assess whether persistent infections contribute to chronic CD4+ T cell activation.Methods: Untreated HIV+ patients and healthy, aged matched controls were recruited and activation levels assessed and compared between cells specific for persistent and non-persistent antigens. Activation levels on antigen-specific CD4+ T cells were measured by intracellular cytokine staining following in vitro stimulation with various recall antigens (CMV, EBV, HSV, VZV and TT) in conjunction with cell surface phenotyping.Results: Activation levels of herpes virus-specific CD4+ T cell populations, assessed by co-expression of CD38 and HLA-DR, were significantly elevated in HIV+ individuals compared to normal controls and compared to TT-specific responses. In contrast, we found similar levels of activation of TT-specific CD4+ T cells in HIV+ and HIV- donors.Conclusions: These results show a disparate distribution of immune activation within CD4+ T cell populations depending on their specificity and suggest that the elevated level of immune activation that characterizes chronic HIV infection may be influenced by the persistence of other antigens. ? 2013 Smith et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1 - 9
Number of pages9
JournalBMC Infectious Diseases
Volume13
Issue number1 (Art. No.:100)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Cite this

Smith, M. Z. D., Bastidas, S., Karrer, U., & Oxenius, A. (2013). Impact of antigen specificity on CD4+ T cell activation in chronic HIV-1 infection. BMC Infectious Diseases, 13(1 (Art. No.:100)), 1 - 9. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-13-100
Smith, Miranda Zoe Denham ; Bastidas, Sonia ; Karrer, Urs ; Oxenius, Annette. / Impact of antigen specificity on CD4+ T cell activation in chronic HIV-1 infection. In: BMC Infectious Diseases. 2013 ; Vol. 13, No. 1 (Art. No.:100). pp. 1 - 9.
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abstract = "Background: HIV infection induces chronic immune activation which is associated with accelerated disease progression; the causes of this activation, however, are incompletely understood. We investigated the activation status of CD4+ T cells specific for chronic herpes viruses and the non-persistent antigen tetanus toxoid (TT) in HIV positive and HIV negative donors to assess whether persistent infections contribute to chronic CD4+ T cell activation.Methods: Untreated HIV+ patients and healthy, aged matched controls were recruited and activation levels assessed and compared between cells specific for persistent and non-persistent antigens. Activation levels on antigen-specific CD4+ T cells were measured by intracellular cytokine staining following in vitro stimulation with various recall antigens (CMV, EBV, HSV, VZV and TT) in conjunction with cell surface phenotyping.Results: Activation levels of herpes virus-specific CD4+ T cell populations, assessed by co-expression of CD38 and HLA-DR, were significantly elevated in HIV+ individuals compared to normal controls and compared to TT-specific responses. In contrast, we found similar levels of activation of TT-specific CD4+ T cells in HIV+ and HIV- donors.Conclusions: These results show a disparate distribution of immune activation within CD4+ T cell populations depending on their specificity and suggest that the elevated level of immune activation that characterizes chronic HIV infection may be influenced by the persistence of other antigens. ? 2013 Smith et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.",
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Smith, MZD, Bastidas, S, Karrer, U & Oxenius, A 2013, 'Impact of antigen specificity on CD4+ T cell activation in chronic HIV-1 infection', BMC Infectious Diseases, vol. 13, no. 1 (Art. No.:100), pp. 1 - 9. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-13-100

Impact of antigen specificity on CD4+ T cell activation in chronic HIV-1 infection. / Smith, Miranda Zoe Denham; Bastidas, Sonia; Karrer, Urs; Oxenius, Annette.

In: BMC Infectious Diseases, Vol. 13, No. 1 (Art. No.:100), 2013, p. 1 - 9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Impact of antigen specificity on CD4+ T cell activation in chronic HIV-1 infection

AU - Smith, Miranda Zoe Denham

AU - Bastidas, Sonia

AU - Karrer, Urs

AU - Oxenius, Annette

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N2 - Background: HIV infection induces chronic immune activation which is associated with accelerated disease progression; the causes of this activation, however, are incompletely understood. We investigated the activation status of CD4+ T cells specific for chronic herpes viruses and the non-persistent antigen tetanus toxoid (TT) in HIV positive and HIV negative donors to assess whether persistent infections contribute to chronic CD4+ T cell activation.Methods: Untreated HIV+ patients and healthy, aged matched controls were recruited and activation levels assessed and compared between cells specific for persistent and non-persistent antigens. Activation levels on antigen-specific CD4+ T cells were measured by intracellular cytokine staining following in vitro stimulation with various recall antigens (CMV, EBV, HSV, VZV and TT) in conjunction with cell surface phenotyping.Results: Activation levels of herpes virus-specific CD4+ T cell populations, assessed by co-expression of CD38 and HLA-DR, were significantly elevated in HIV+ individuals compared to normal controls and compared to TT-specific responses. In contrast, we found similar levels of activation of TT-specific CD4+ T cells in HIV+ and HIV- donors.Conclusions: These results show a disparate distribution of immune activation within CD4+ T cell populations depending on their specificity and suggest that the elevated level of immune activation that characterizes chronic HIV infection may be influenced by the persistence of other antigens. ? 2013 Smith et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

AB - Background: HIV infection induces chronic immune activation which is associated with accelerated disease progression; the causes of this activation, however, are incompletely understood. We investigated the activation status of CD4+ T cells specific for chronic herpes viruses and the non-persistent antigen tetanus toxoid (TT) in HIV positive and HIV negative donors to assess whether persistent infections contribute to chronic CD4+ T cell activation.Methods: Untreated HIV+ patients and healthy, aged matched controls were recruited and activation levels assessed and compared between cells specific for persistent and non-persistent antigens. Activation levels on antigen-specific CD4+ T cells were measured by intracellular cytokine staining following in vitro stimulation with various recall antigens (CMV, EBV, HSV, VZV and TT) in conjunction with cell surface phenotyping.Results: Activation levels of herpes virus-specific CD4+ T cell populations, assessed by co-expression of CD38 and HLA-DR, were significantly elevated in HIV+ individuals compared to normal controls and compared to TT-specific responses. In contrast, we found similar levels of activation of TT-specific CD4+ T cells in HIV+ and HIV- donors.Conclusions: These results show a disparate distribution of immune activation within CD4+ T cell populations depending on their specificity and suggest that the elevated level of immune activation that characterizes chronic HIV infection may be influenced by the persistence of other antigens. ? 2013 Smith et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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