Immunoproteomics: Mass spectrometry-based methods to study the targets of the immune response

A. W. Purcell, J. J. Gorman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The mammalian immune system has evolved to display fragments of protein antigens derived from microbial pathogens to immune effector cells. These fragments are typically peptides liberated from the intact antigens through distinct proteolytic mechanisms that are subsequently transported to the cell surface bound to chaper-one-like receptors known as major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. These complexes are then scrutinized by effector T cells that express clonally distributed T cell receptors with specificity for specific MHC-peptide complexes. In normal uninfected cells, this process of antigen processing and presentation occurs continuously, with the resultant array of self-antigen-derived peptides displayed on the surface of these cells. Changes in this peptide landscape of cells act to alert immune effector cells to changes in the intracellular environment that may be associated with infection, malignant transformation, or other abnormal cellular processes, resulting in a cascade of events that result in their elimination. Because peptides play such a crucial role in informing the immune system of infection with viral or microbial pathogens and the transformation of cells in malignancy, the tools of proteomics, in particular mass spectrometry, are ideally suited to study these immune responses at a molecular level. Here we review recent advances in the studies of immune responses that have utilized mass spectrometry and associated technologies, with specific examples from collaboration between our laboratories.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-208
Number of pages16
JournalMolecular and Cellular Proteomics
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2004
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

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abstract = "The mammalian immune system has evolved to display fragments of protein antigens derived from microbial pathogens to immune effector cells. These fragments are typically peptides liberated from the intact antigens through distinct proteolytic mechanisms that are subsequently transported to the cell surface bound to chaper-one-like receptors known as major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. These complexes are then scrutinized by effector T cells that express clonally distributed T cell receptors with specificity for specific MHC-peptide complexes. In normal uninfected cells, this process of antigen processing and presentation occurs continuously, with the resultant array of self-antigen-derived peptides displayed on the surface of these cells. Changes in this peptide landscape of cells act to alert immune effector cells to changes in the intracellular environment that may be associated with infection, malignant transformation, or other abnormal cellular processes, resulting in a cascade of events that result in their elimination. Because peptides play such a crucial role in informing the immune system of infection with viral or microbial pathogens and the transformation of cells in malignancy, the tools of proteomics, in particular mass spectrometry, are ideally suited to study these immune responses at a molecular level. Here we review recent advances in the studies of immune responses that have utilized mass spectrometry and associated technologies, with specific examples from collaboration between our laboratories.",
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Immunoproteomics : Mass spectrometry-based methods to study the targets of the immune response. / Purcell, A. W.; Gorman, J. J.

In: Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, Vol. 3, No. 3, 01.03.2004, p. 193-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

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