Identification of strains of RotaTeq rotavirus vaccine in infants with gastroenteritis following routine vaccination

Celeste M. Donato, Ling Sing Ch'ng, Karen F. Boniface, Nigel W. Crawford, Jim P. Buttery, Michael Lyon, Ruth F. Bishop, Carl D. Kirkwood

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Abstract

Background. RotaTeq vaccine was introduced into the Australian National Immunisation Program in 2007. This study identified and characterised rotavirus strains excreted by infants who presented with symptoms of gastroenteritis following recent RotaTeq vaccination.
Methods. Fecal samples (N = 61) from children who developed gastroenteritis following recent RotaTeq vaccination were forwarded to the Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program (ARSP). RotaTeq-positive samples were genotyped and regions of the VP3, VP4, VP6, and VP7 genes were sequenced. Also, 460 rotavirus-positive ARSP routine surveillance samples were analyzed by dot-blot Northern hybridization to detect RotaTeq vaccine–derived strains circulating in the community.
Results. Thirteen of the 61 samples collected from infants developing gastroenteritis after RotaTeq vaccination contained vaccine-derived (vd) rotavirus strains. Of these, 4 contained a vdG1P[8] strain derived by reassortment between the G1P[5] and G6P[8] parental vaccine strains. Northern hybridization analysis of 460 surveillance samples identified 3 samples that contained RotaTeq vaccine–derived strains, including 2 vdG1P[8] reassortant vaccine strains.
Conclusions. During replication and excretion of RotaTeq vaccine, reassortment of parental strains can occur. Shedding of RotaTeq vaccine strains in 7 of 13 infants was associated with underlying medical conditions that may have altered their immune function. The benefits of vaccination outweigh any small risk of vaccine-associated gastroenteritis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)377-383
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume206
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2012

Cite this

Donato, Celeste M. ; Ch'ng, Ling Sing ; Boniface, Karen F. ; Crawford, Nigel W. ; Buttery, Jim P. ; Lyon, Michael ; Bishop, Ruth F. ; Kirkwood, Carl D. / Identification of strains of RotaTeq rotavirus vaccine in infants with gastroenteritis following routine vaccination. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2012 ; Vol. 206, No. 3. pp. 377-383.
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abstract = "Background. RotaTeq vaccine was introduced into the Australian National Immunisation Program in 2007. This study identified and characterised rotavirus strains excreted by infants who presented with symptoms of gastroenteritis following recent RotaTeq vaccination.Methods. Fecal samples (N = 61) from children who developed gastroenteritis following recent RotaTeq vaccination were forwarded to the Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program (ARSP). RotaTeq-positive samples were genotyped and regions of the VP3, VP4, VP6, and VP7 genes were sequenced. Also, 460 rotavirus-positive ARSP routine surveillance samples were analyzed by dot-blot Northern hybridization to detect RotaTeq vaccine–derived strains circulating in the community.Results. Thirteen of the 61 samples collected from infants developing gastroenteritis after RotaTeq vaccination contained vaccine-derived (vd) rotavirus strains. Of these, 4 contained a vdG1P[8] strain derived by reassortment between the G1P[5] and G6P[8] parental vaccine strains. Northern hybridization analysis of 460 surveillance samples identified 3 samples that contained RotaTeq vaccine–derived strains, including 2 vdG1P[8] reassortant vaccine strains.Conclusions. During replication and excretion of RotaTeq vaccine, reassortment of parental strains can occur. Shedding of RotaTeq vaccine strains in 7 of 13 infants was associated with underlying medical conditions that may have altered their immune function. The benefits of vaccination outweigh any small risk of vaccine-associated gastroenteritis.",
author = "Donato, {Celeste M.} and Ch'ng, {Ling Sing} and Boniface, {Karen F.} and Crawford, {Nigel W.} and Buttery, {Jim P.} and Michael Lyon and Bishop, {Ruth F.} and Kirkwood, {Carl D.}",
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Identification of strains of RotaTeq rotavirus vaccine in infants with gastroenteritis following routine vaccination. / Donato, Celeste M.; Ch'ng, Ling Sing; Boniface, Karen F.; Crawford, Nigel W.; Buttery, Jim P.; Lyon, Michael; Bishop, Ruth F.; Kirkwood, Carl D.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 206, No. 3, 08.2012, p. 377-383.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Identification of strains of RotaTeq rotavirus vaccine in infants with gastroenteritis following routine vaccination

AU - Donato, Celeste M.

AU - Ch'ng, Ling Sing

AU - Boniface, Karen F.

AU - Crawford, Nigel W.

AU - Buttery, Jim P.

AU - Lyon, Michael

AU - Bishop, Ruth F.

AU - Kirkwood, Carl D.

PY - 2012/8

Y1 - 2012/8

N2 - Background. RotaTeq vaccine was introduced into the Australian National Immunisation Program in 2007. This study identified and characterised rotavirus strains excreted by infants who presented with symptoms of gastroenteritis following recent RotaTeq vaccination.Methods. Fecal samples (N = 61) from children who developed gastroenteritis following recent RotaTeq vaccination were forwarded to the Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program (ARSP). RotaTeq-positive samples were genotyped and regions of the VP3, VP4, VP6, and VP7 genes were sequenced. Also, 460 rotavirus-positive ARSP routine surveillance samples were analyzed by dot-blot Northern hybridization to detect RotaTeq vaccine–derived strains circulating in the community.Results. Thirteen of the 61 samples collected from infants developing gastroenteritis after RotaTeq vaccination contained vaccine-derived (vd) rotavirus strains. Of these, 4 contained a vdG1P[8] strain derived by reassortment between the G1P[5] and G6P[8] parental vaccine strains. Northern hybridization analysis of 460 surveillance samples identified 3 samples that contained RotaTeq vaccine–derived strains, including 2 vdG1P[8] reassortant vaccine strains.Conclusions. During replication and excretion of RotaTeq vaccine, reassortment of parental strains can occur. Shedding of RotaTeq vaccine strains in 7 of 13 infants was associated with underlying medical conditions that may have altered their immune function. The benefits of vaccination outweigh any small risk of vaccine-associated gastroenteritis.

AB - Background. RotaTeq vaccine was introduced into the Australian National Immunisation Program in 2007. This study identified and characterised rotavirus strains excreted by infants who presented with symptoms of gastroenteritis following recent RotaTeq vaccination.Methods. Fecal samples (N = 61) from children who developed gastroenteritis following recent RotaTeq vaccination were forwarded to the Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program (ARSP). RotaTeq-positive samples were genotyped and regions of the VP3, VP4, VP6, and VP7 genes were sequenced. Also, 460 rotavirus-positive ARSP routine surveillance samples were analyzed by dot-blot Northern hybridization to detect RotaTeq vaccine–derived strains circulating in the community.Results. Thirteen of the 61 samples collected from infants developing gastroenteritis after RotaTeq vaccination contained vaccine-derived (vd) rotavirus strains. Of these, 4 contained a vdG1P[8] strain derived by reassortment between the G1P[5] and G6P[8] parental vaccine strains. Northern hybridization analysis of 460 surveillance samples identified 3 samples that contained RotaTeq vaccine–derived strains, including 2 vdG1P[8] reassortant vaccine strains.Conclusions. During replication and excretion of RotaTeq vaccine, reassortment of parental strains can occur. Shedding of RotaTeq vaccine strains in 7 of 13 infants was associated with underlying medical conditions that may have altered their immune function. The benefits of vaccination outweigh any small risk of vaccine-associated gastroenteritis.

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JO - Journal of Infectious Diseases

JF - Journal of Infectious Diseases

SN - 0022-1899

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