Identification of major factors in Australian primary care pharmacists' practice environment that have a bearing on the implementation of professional models of practice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective The aim of the present study was to describe an environmental framework for pharmacists in primary care in Australia and determine the major factors within that environment that have the greatest bearing on their capacity to implement patient-focused models of professional practice. 

Methods A draft framework for pharmacists' practice was developed by allocating structures, systems and related factors known to the researchers or identified from the literature as existing within pharmacists' internal, operational and external environments to one of five domains: Social, Technological, Economic, Environmental or Political [STEEP]. Focus groups of pharmacists used an adapted nominal group technique to assess the draft and add factors where necessary. Where applicable, factors were consolidated into groups to establish a revised framework. The three major factors or groups in each domain were identified. The results were compared with the enabling factors described in the profession's vision statement. 

Results Seventy-eight individual factors were ultimately identified, with 86% able to be grouped. The three dominant groups in each of the five domains that had a bearing on the implementation of professional models of practice were as follows: (1) Social: the education of pharmacists, their beliefs and the capacity of the pharmacist workforce; (2) Technological: current and future practice models, technology and workplace structures; (3) Economic: funding of services, the viability of practice and operation of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme; (4) Environmental: attitudes and expectations of stakeholders, including consumers, health system reform and external competition; and (5) Political: regulation of practice, representation of the profession and policies affecting practice. 

Conclusions The three dominant groups of factors in each of the five STEEP environmental domains, which have a bearing on pharmacists' capacity to implement patient-focused models of practice, correlate well with the enabling factors identified in the profession's vision statement, with the addition of three factors in the Environmental domain of stakeholder attitudes, health system reform and external competition. 

What is known about the topic? The extensive range of patient-focused professional programs developed for application by pharmacists in primary care in Australia has yet to be widely implemented. 

What does this paper add? Factors both within and beyond the pharmacists' immediate practice environment that have a bearing on the uptake of professional programs have been identified and prioritised using a structured thematic approach. 

What are the implications for practitioners? The results demonstrate the need for a multifactorial approach to the implementation of professional models of practice in this setting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)378-383
Number of pages6
JournalAustralian Health Review
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Cite this