How inclusive are the teaching practices of my German, Maths and English teachers? – psychometric properties of a newly developed scale to assess personalisation and differentiation in teaching practices

Susanne Schwab, Umesh Sharma, Lisa Hoffmann

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    23 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Within the current policy and legislative context of educating students with and without special educational needs (SEN) together in one classroom, the question that is frequently raised by educators relates to how best to implement inclusion and meet the different needs of their students in class. It is also important to understand all students’ perceptions about being included in regular classrooms. Therefore, the study examined secondary school students’ perceptions about the use of inclusive teaching practices by their different subject teachers. The main objective was to report on the psychometric properties of a newly developed questionnaire measuring students’ perceptions about their teachers’ use of inclusive teaching practices. A total of 665 secondary grade students rated the use of inclusive teaching practices for their two main subject teachers (German, Maths or English). The study found that the 14-item scale had high reliability (α = ranging 0.81 for German to 0.87 for English teachers) and consisted of two factors (‘Personalisation’ and ‘Differentiation’). According to the students’ perceptions, all subject teachers used some inclusive practices but they were not highly inclusive. A comparison showed that Maths teachers were more inclusive compared to their German counterpart. Implications for school educators and researchers are discussed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)61-76
    Number of pages16
    JournalInternational Journal of Inclusive Education
    Volume26
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2022

    Keywords

    • Inclusive education
    • inclusive teaching practices
    • secondary schools
    • students’ perceptions

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