Homology Modeling of GPCRs

John Watson Simms, Nathan Eric Hall, Polo HC Lam, Arthur Christopoulos, Ruben Abagyan, Patrick Sexton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over 1000 sequences likely to encode G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are currently available in publicly accessible and proprietary databases and this number may grow with the refinement of a number of different genomes. However, despite recent efforts in the crystallization of these proteins, homology modeling approaches are becoming widely used as a method for obtaining quantitative and qualitative information for structure-based drug design as well as the interpretation of experimental data.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMethods in Molecular Biology - G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Drug Delivery
EditorsWayne R Leifert
Place of PublicationUSA
PublisherHumana Press
Pages97 - 113
Number of pages17
Edition552
ISBN (Print)9781603273169
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Cite this

Simms, J. W., Hall, N. E., Lam, P. HC., Christopoulos, A., Abagyan, R., & Sexton, P. (2009). Homology Modeling of GPCRs. In W. R. Leifert (Ed.), Methods in Molecular Biology - G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Drug Delivery (552 ed., pp. 97 - 113). USA: Humana Press.
Simms, John Watson ; Hall, Nathan Eric ; Lam, Polo HC ; Christopoulos, Arthur ; Abagyan, Ruben ; Sexton, Patrick. / Homology Modeling of GPCRs. Methods in Molecular Biology - G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Drug Delivery. editor / Wayne R Leifert. 552. ed. USA : Humana Press, 2009. pp. 97 - 113
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Simms, JW, Hall, NE, Lam, PHC, Christopoulos, A, Abagyan, R & Sexton, P 2009, Homology Modeling of GPCRs. in WR Leifert (ed.), Methods in Molecular Biology - G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Drug Delivery. 552 edn, Humana Press, USA, pp. 97 - 113.

Homology Modeling of GPCRs. / Simms, John Watson; Hall, Nathan Eric; Lam, Polo HC; Christopoulos, Arthur; Abagyan, Ruben; Sexton, Patrick.

Methods in Molecular Biology - G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Drug Delivery. ed. / Wayne R Leifert. 552. ed. USA : Humana Press, 2009. p. 97 - 113.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

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AU - Lam, Polo HC

AU - Christopoulos, Arthur

AU - Abagyan, Ruben

AU - Sexton, Patrick

PY - 2009

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AB - Over 1000 sequences likely to encode G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are currently available in publicly accessible and proprietary databases and this number may grow with the refinement of a number of different genomes. However, despite recent efforts in the crystallization of these proteins, homology modeling approaches are becoming widely used as a method for obtaining quantitative and qualitative information for structure-based drug design as well as the interpretation of experimental data.

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BT - Methods in Molecular Biology - G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Drug Delivery

A2 - Leifert, Wayne R

PB - Humana Press

CY - USA

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Simms JW, Hall NE, Lam PHC, Christopoulos A, Abagyan R, Sexton P. Homology Modeling of GPCRs. In Leifert WR, editor, Methods in Molecular Biology - G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Drug Delivery. 552 ed. USA: Humana Press. 2009. p. 97 - 113