HLA studies of highland and coastal New Guineans

G. Crane, K. Bhatia, M. Honeyman, T. Doran, N. Messel, G. Hakos, D. Tarlinton, D. B. Amos, H. Bashir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The HLA profile of three New Guinean populations, two Highland (Asaro, Watut), and one Coastal is presented. The Highland populations are characterized by a low average number of alleles segregating at the HLA loci and also by a low mean value of heterozygosity at these loci. The genetic affinities of the two Highland groups with other Melanesian populations in the Pacific are remote. The Coastal group, on the other hand, shows strong similarities in its antigenic diversity and haplotypic combinations with other Melanesian populations. Nonetheless, the two Highland groups show significant divergence from each other in terms of allelic and haplotypic frequencies. Two different waves of migration settled in the Highlands of New Guinea between 10,000 and 15,000 years ago, and it is possible that the Watut, an Angan speaking group, represents the remnants of the first migration into the interior, whereas the Asaro, members of the Eastern Central family of the Trans-New Guinea phylum, arrived at a later date.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-260
Number of pages14
JournalHuman Immunology
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1985

Cite this

Crane, G., Bhatia, K., Honeyman, M., Doran, T., Messel, N., Hakos, G., ... Bashir, H. (1985). HLA studies of highland and coastal New Guineans. Human Immunology, 12(4), 247-260. https://doi.org/10.1016/0198-8859(85)90340-4
Crane, G. ; Bhatia, K. ; Honeyman, M. ; Doran, T. ; Messel, N. ; Hakos, G. ; Tarlinton, D. ; Amos, D. B. ; Bashir, H. / HLA studies of highland and coastal New Guineans. In: Human Immunology. 1985 ; Vol. 12, No. 4. pp. 247-260.
@article{0e013b254d0043e88df0b60fda89e638,
title = "HLA studies of highland and coastal New Guineans",
abstract = "The HLA profile of three New Guinean populations, two Highland (Asaro, Watut), and one Coastal is presented. The Highland populations are characterized by a low average number of alleles segregating at the HLA loci and also by a low mean value of heterozygosity at these loci. The genetic affinities of the two Highland groups with other Melanesian populations in the Pacific are remote. The Coastal group, on the other hand, shows strong similarities in its antigenic diversity and haplotypic combinations with other Melanesian populations. Nonetheless, the two Highland groups show significant divergence from each other in terms of allelic and haplotypic frequencies. Two different waves of migration settled in the Highlands of New Guinea between 10,000 and 15,000 years ago, and it is possible that the Watut, an Angan speaking group, represents the remnants of the first migration into the interior, whereas the Asaro, members of the Eastern Central family of the Trans-New Guinea phylum, arrived at a later date.",
author = "G. Crane and K. Bhatia and M. Honeyman and T. Doran and N. Messel and G. Hakos and D. Tarlinton and Amos, {D. B.} and H. Bashir",
year = "1985",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0198-8859(85)90340-4",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "247--260",
journal = "Human Immunology",
issn = "0198-8859",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "4",

}

Crane, G, Bhatia, K, Honeyman, M, Doran, T, Messel, N, Hakos, G, Tarlinton, D, Amos, DB & Bashir, H 1985, 'HLA studies of highland and coastal New Guineans', Human Immunology, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 247-260. https://doi.org/10.1016/0198-8859(85)90340-4

HLA studies of highland and coastal New Guineans. / Crane, G.; Bhatia, K.; Honeyman, M.; Doran, T.; Messel, N.; Hakos, G.; Tarlinton, D.; Amos, D. B.; Bashir, H.

In: Human Immunology, Vol. 12, No. 4, 01.01.1985, p. 247-260.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - HLA studies of highland and coastal New Guineans

AU - Crane, G.

AU - Bhatia, K.

AU - Honeyman, M.

AU - Doran, T.

AU - Messel, N.

AU - Hakos, G.

AU - Tarlinton, D.

AU - Amos, D. B.

AU - Bashir, H.

PY - 1985/1/1

Y1 - 1985/1/1

N2 - The HLA profile of three New Guinean populations, two Highland (Asaro, Watut), and one Coastal is presented. The Highland populations are characterized by a low average number of alleles segregating at the HLA loci and also by a low mean value of heterozygosity at these loci. The genetic affinities of the two Highland groups with other Melanesian populations in the Pacific are remote. The Coastal group, on the other hand, shows strong similarities in its antigenic diversity and haplotypic combinations with other Melanesian populations. Nonetheless, the two Highland groups show significant divergence from each other in terms of allelic and haplotypic frequencies. Two different waves of migration settled in the Highlands of New Guinea between 10,000 and 15,000 years ago, and it is possible that the Watut, an Angan speaking group, represents the remnants of the first migration into the interior, whereas the Asaro, members of the Eastern Central family of the Trans-New Guinea phylum, arrived at a later date.

AB - The HLA profile of three New Guinean populations, two Highland (Asaro, Watut), and one Coastal is presented. The Highland populations are characterized by a low average number of alleles segregating at the HLA loci and also by a low mean value of heterozygosity at these loci. The genetic affinities of the two Highland groups with other Melanesian populations in the Pacific are remote. The Coastal group, on the other hand, shows strong similarities in its antigenic diversity and haplotypic combinations with other Melanesian populations. Nonetheless, the two Highland groups show significant divergence from each other in terms of allelic and haplotypic frequencies. Two different waves of migration settled in the Highlands of New Guinea between 10,000 and 15,000 years ago, and it is possible that the Watut, an Angan speaking group, represents the remnants of the first migration into the interior, whereas the Asaro, members of the Eastern Central family of the Trans-New Guinea phylum, arrived at a later date.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0021909496&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0198-8859(85)90340-4

DO - 10.1016/0198-8859(85)90340-4

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 247

EP - 260

JO - Human Immunology

JF - Human Immunology

SN - 0198-8859

IS - 4

ER -

Crane G, Bhatia K, Honeyman M, Doran T, Messel N, Hakos G et al. HLA studies of highland and coastal New Guineans. Human Immunology. 1985 Jan 1;12(4):247-260. https://doi.org/10.1016/0198-8859(85)90340-4