HIV Vaccines

One Step Closer

Research output: Contribution to journalShort SurveyOtherpeer-review

Abstract

Currently there is no effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Four recently published studies in Cell and Immunity now show that using planned sequential boosting with antigens to guide the humoral response towards broadly neutralizing antibodies could provide a solution to achieving vaccination against HIV-1.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-3
Number of pages3
JournalTrends in Molecular Medicine
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

Cite this

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title = "HIV Vaccines: One Step Closer",
abstract = "Currently there is no effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Four recently published studies in Cell and Immunity now show that using planned sequential boosting with antigens to guide the humoral response towards broadly neutralizing antibodies could provide a solution to achieving vaccination against HIV-1.",
author = "Low, {Michael Sze Yuan} and David Tarlinton",
year = "2017",
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journal = "Trends in Molecular Medicine",
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HIV Vaccines : One Step Closer. / Low, Michael Sze Yuan; Tarlinton, David.

In: Trends in Molecular Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 1-3.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort SurveyOtherpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - HIV Vaccines

T2 - One Step Closer

AU - Low, Michael Sze Yuan

AU - Tarlinton, David

PY - 2017/1/1

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AB - Currently there is no effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Four recently published studies in Cell and Immunity now show that using planned sequential boosting with antigens to guide the humoral response towards broadly neutralizing antibodies could provide a solution to achieving vaccination against HIV-1.

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U2 - 10.1016/j.molmed.2016.10.006

DO - 10.1016/j.molmed.2016.10.006

M3 - Short Survey

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JO - Trends in Molecular Medicine

JF - Trends in Molecular Medicine

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