Hero, voyeur, judge: understanding medical students' moral identities through professionalism dilemma narratives

Lynn V. Monrouxe, Charlotte E. Rees

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Otherpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Becoming a doctor entails assimilating a wide variety of knowledge, skills and attitudes required for clinical practice. The Hippocratic oath embodied a basic ethic that is prevalent, including that doctors should act in the best interests of their patients, acknowledge the limits of their own knowledge, recognise that there is an art to medicine with warmth and sympathy towards patients, and maintain patient confidentiality. This chapter considers medical students’ social identities as moral actors within their narratives of professionalism dilemmas encountered within the clinical workplace. The construction of the perpetrator within the narratives could be partly due to the different ways that they considered the people to be at the time, thereby influencing student action. Understanding how medical students narrate their moral identities, therefore, has implications for medical educators in their role of facilitating students’ good ethical practice.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSelf and Social Identity in Educational Contexts
EditorsKenneth I. Mavor, Michael J. Platow, Boris Bizumic
Place of PublicationOxon, UK
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Chapter17
Pages297-319
Number of pages23
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781317599760
ISBN (Print)9781138815131, 9781138815155
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

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