Hecklevision, barrage cinema and bullet screens: An intercultural analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Drawing on interviews with Hecklevision programmers and the founder of software company MuVChat, this article outlines three related ‘live commenting’ phenomena that cross diverse cultural contexts: Hecklevision in the US; ‘barrage cinema’ in China and online video ‘bullet screens’ (danmu/danmaku) in China and Japan. By comparing and contrasting these text-on-screen modalities of engagement, I draw attention to underlying connections around ‘bad’ behaviour and digital disruption while also noting some of the cultural specificities and discursive frameworks at play. This intercultural analysis aims to uncover what is at stake in technology-led, interactive screen experiences when audiences take centre stage via written rather than spoken interjection. Such ‘live commenting’ points to the ‘textual intensity’ of the digital era and the culturally distinct yet interrelated ways in which diverse audiences respond.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)571-589
Number of pages19
JournalParticipations
Volume14
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 30 Nov 2017

Keywords

  • Alamo Drafhouse
  • Bad-Film
  • Bullet Subtitles
  • Danmaku/Danmu
  • Texting
  • Interactive Cinema
  • Live-Commenting
  • MuVChat
  • Participatory Screenings
  • Tucao

Cite this

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title = "Hecklevision, barrage cinema and bullet screens:: An intercultural analysis",
abstract = "Drawing on interviews with Hecklevision programmers and the founder of software company MuVChat, this article outlines three related ‘live commenting’ phenomena that cross diverse cultural contexts: Hecklevision in the US; ‘barrage cinema’ in China and online video ‘bullet screens’ (danmu/danmaku) in China and Japan. By comparing and contrasting these text-on-screen modalities of engagement, I draw attention to underlying connections around ‘bad’ behaviour and digital disruption while also noting some of the cultural specificities and discursive frameworks at play. This intercultural analysis aims to uncover what is at stake in technology-led, interactive screen experiences when audiences take centre stage via written rather than spoken interjection. Such ‘live commenting’ points to the ‘textual intensity’ of the digital era and the culturally distinct yet interrelated ways in which diverse audiences respond.",
keywords = "Alamo Drafhouse, Bad-Film, Bullet Subtitles, Danmaku/Danmu, Texting, Interactive Cinema, Live-Commenting, MuVChat, Participatory Screenings, Tucao",
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Hecklevision, barrage cinema and bullet screens: An intercultural analysis. / Dwyer, Tessa.

In: Participations, Vol. 14, No. 2, 30.11.2017, p. 571-589.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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