GW170817: Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Neutron Star Inspiral

LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

On August 17, 2017 at 12-41:04 UTC the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors made their first observation of a binary neutron star inspiral. The signal, GW170817, was detected with a combined signal-to-noise ratio of 32.4 and a false-alarm-rate estimate of less than one per 8.0×104 years. We infer the component masses of the binary to be between 0.86 and 2.26 M, in agreement with masses of known neutron stars. Restricting the component spins to the range inferred in binary neutron stars, we find the component masses to be in the range 1.17-1.60 M, with the total mass of the system 2.74-0.01+0.04M. The source was localized within a sky region of 28 deg2 (90% probability) and had a luminosity distance of 40-14+8 Mpc, the closest and most precisely localized gravitational-wave signal yet. The association with the γ-ray burst GRB 170817A, detected by Fermi-GBM 1.7 s after the coalescence, corroborates the hypothesis of a neutron star merger and provides the first direct evidence of a link between these mergers and short γ-ray bursts. Subsequent identification of transient counterparts across the electromagnetic spectrum in the same location further supports the interpretation of this event as a neutron star merger. This unprecedented joint gravitational and electromagnetic observation provides insight into astrophysics, dense matter, gravitation, and cosmology.

Original languageEnglish
Article number161101
Number of pages18
JournalPhysical Review Letters
Volume119
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Oct 2017

Cite this

LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration. / GW170817 : Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Neutron Star Inspiral. In: Physical Review Letters. 2017 ; Vol. 119, No. 16.
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title = "GW170817: Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Neutron Star Inspiral",
abstract = "On August 17, 2017 at 12-41:04 UTC the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors made their first observation of a binary neutron star inspiral. The signal, GW170817, was detected with a combined signal-to-noise ratio of 32.4 and a false-alarm-rate estimate of less than one per 8.0×104 years. We infer the component masses of the binary to be between 0.86 and 2.26 M, in agreement with masses of known neutron stars. Restricting the component spins to the range inferred in binary neutron stars, we find the component masses to be in the range 1.17-1.60 M, with the total mass of the system 2.74-0.01+0.04M. The source was localized within a sky region of 28 deg2 (90{\%} probability) and had a luminosity distance of 40-14+8 Mpc, the closest and most precisely localized gravitational-wave signal yet. The association with the γ-ray burst GRB 170817A, detected by Fermi-GBM 1.7 s after the coalescence, corroborates the hypothesis of a neutron star merger and provides the first direct evidence of a link between these mergers and short γ-ray bursts. Subsequent identification of transient counterparts across the electromagnetic spectrum in the same location further supports the interpretation of this event as a neutron star merger. This unprecedented joint gravitational and electromagnetic observation provides insight into astrophysics, dense matter, gravitation, and cosmology.",
author = "Ackley, {Kendall Danielle} and Sylvia Biscoveanu and Boris Goncharov and Lasky, {Paul Daniel} and Yuri Levin and McNeill, {Lucy Olivia} and Sammut, {Letizia Maria} and Smith, {Rory James} and Talbot, {Colm Michael} and Eric Thrane and Chris Whittle and Xingjiang Zhu and {LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration}",
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GW170817 : Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Neutron Star Inspiral. / LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration.

In: Physical Review Letters, Vol. 119, No. 16, 161101, 16.10.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Ackley, Kendall Danielle

AU - Biscoveanu, Sylvia

AU - Goncharov, Boris

AU - Lasky, Paul Daniel

AU - Levin, Yuri

AU - McNeill, Lucy Olivia

AU - Sammut, Letizia Maria

AU - Smith, Rory James

AU - Talbot, Colm Michael

AU - Thrane, Eric

AU - Whittle, Chris

AU - Zhu, Xingjiang

AU - LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration

PY - 2017/10/16

Y1 - 2017/10/16

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AB - On August 17, 2017 at 12-41:04 UTC the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors made their first observation of a binary neutron star inspiral. The signal, GW170817, was detected with a combined signal-to-noise ratio of 32.4 and a false-alarm-rate estimate of less than one per 8.0×104 years. We infer the component masses of the binary to be between 0.86 and 2.26 M, in agreement with masses of known neutron stars. Restricting the component spins to the range inferred in binary neutron stars, we find the component masses to be in the range 1.17-1.60 M, with the total mass of the system 2.74-0.01+0.04M. The source was localized within a sky region of 28 deg2 (90% probability) and had a luminosity distance of 40-14+8 Mpc, the closest and most precisely localized gravitational-wave signal yet. The association with the γ-ray burst GRB 170817A, detected by Fermi-GBM 1.7 s after the coalescence, corroborates the hypothesis of a neutron star merger and provides the first direct evidence of a link between these mergers and short γ-ray bursts. Subsequent identification of transient counterparts across the electromagnetic spectrum in the same location further supports the interpretation of this event as a neutron star merger. This unprecedented joint gravitational and electromagnetic observation provides insight into astrophysics, dense matter, gravitation, and cosmology.

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