Group differences in social inclusion between young adults aged 18 to 25 with serious mental illness and same-aged peers from the general community

Andrew Gardner, Sue Cotton, Brian O'Donoghue, Eoin Killackey, Peter Norton, Kate Filia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Aims: Young adults with serious mental illness (SMI) are thought to be socially excluded. However, psychometric measures of social inclusion have not been employed to examine group differences relative to peers from the general community. The aim of this study was to employ such a measure to determine differences in social inclusion between young adults with SMI and peers from the general community. Methods: A cross-sectional hierarchical logistic regression was conducted to identify which dimensions and individual indicators from the Filia Social Inclusion Measure (F-SIM) discriminated between n = 152 young adults aged 18–25 from the general community (M = 21.36, SD = 2.16) and n = 159 young adults aged 18–25 with SMI (M = 21.13, SD = 2.21). Results: Group membership was accounted for by Interpersonal Connections (Nagelkerke R2 =.32), Vocational & Financial Security (Nagelkerke R2 =.32) and Healthy Independent Lifestyle (Nagelkerke R2 =.08) dimensions of the F-SIM. Relative to young adults from the general community, those with SMI were five times less likely to feel they had friends who would call on them in a crisis, odds ratio (OR) =.19 (95%CI =.04,.53), p =.04, almost five times more likely to live with their parents, OR = 4.79 (95%CI = 1.98,11.15), p =.004, almost four times less likely to have worked/studied any time over the past 12 months, OR =.27 (95%CI =.11,.64), p <.001, and three-and-a-half times more likely to report unstable accommodation, OR = 3.58 (95%CI = 1.14, 11.15), p =.03. Conclusion: Young adults with SMI are socially excluded relative to peers from the general community in terms of interpersonal connections, vocational engagement, autonomy/independence and housing stability. In addition to the well-established focus on vocational engagement, interventions to improve social inclusion in this population must promote reciprocity within social relationships and healthy autonomy/independence (including stable housing).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)631-642
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Social Psychiatry
Volume65
Issue number7-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2019

Keywords

  • group difference
  • mental illness
  • social exclusion
  • Social inclusion
  • young adult

Cite this

@article{4890a18ad29d4b1eac256271959491c3,
title = "Group differences in social inclusion between young adults aged 18 to 25 with serious mental illness and same-aged peers from the general community",
abstract = "Aims: Young adults with serious mental illness (SMI) are thought to be socially excluded. However, psychometric measures of social inclusion have not been employed to examine group differences relative to peers from the general community. The aim of this study was to employ such a measure to determine differences in social inclusion between young adults with SMI and peers from the general community. Methods: A cross-sectional hierarchical logistic regression was conducted to identify which dimensions and individual indicators from the Filia Social Inclusion Measure (F-SIM) discriminated between n = 152 young adults aged 18–25 from the general community (M = 21.36, SD = 2.16) and n = 159 young adults aged 18–25 with SMI (M = 21.13, SD = 2.21). Results: Group membership was accounted for by Interpersonal Connections (Nagelkerke R2 =.32), Vocational & Financial Security (Nagelkerke R2 =.32) and Healthy Independent Lifestyle (Nagelkerke R2 =.08) dimensions of the F-SIM. Relative to young adults from the general community, those with SMI were five times less likely to feel they had friends who would call on them in a crisis, odds ratio (OR) =.19 (95{\%}CI =.04,.53), p =.04, almost five times more likely to live with their parents, OR = 4.79 (95{\%}CI = 1.98,11.15), p =.004, almost four times less likely to have worked/studied any time over the past 12 months, OR =.27 (95{\%}CI =.11,.64), p <.001, and three-and-a-half times more likely to report unstable accommodation, OR = 3.58 (95{\%}CI = 1.14, 11.15), p =.03. Conclusion: Young adults with SMI are socially excluded relative to peers from the general community in terms of interpersonal connections, vocational engagement, autonomy/independence and housing stability. In addition to the well-established focus on vocational engagement, interventions to improve social inclusion in this population must promote reciprocity within social relationships and healthy autonomy/independence (including stable housing).",
keywords = "group difference, mental illness, social exclusion, Social inclusion, young adult",
author = "Andrew Gardner and Sue Cotton and Brian O'Donoghue and Eoin Killackey and Peter Norton and Kate Filia",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0020764019868749",
language = "English",
volume = "65",
pages = "631--642",
journal = "International Journal of Social Psychiatry",
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Group differences in social inclusion between young adults aged 18 to 25 with serious mental illness and same-aged peers from the general community. / Gardner, Andrew; Cotton, Sue; O'Donoghue, Brian; Killackey, Eoin; Norton, Peter; Filia, Kate.

In: International Journal of Social Psychiatry, Vol. 65, No. 7-8, 01.11.2019, p. 631-642.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Group differences in social inclusion between young adults aged 18 to 25 with serious mental illness and same-aged peers from the general community

AU - Gardner, Andrew

AU - Cotton, Sue

AU - O'Donoghue, Brian

AU - Killackey, Eoin

AU - Norton, Peter

AU - Filia, Kate

PY - 2019/11/1

Y1 - 2019/11/1

N2 - Aims: Young adults with serious mental illness (SMI) are thought to be socially excluded. However, psychometric measures of social inclusion have not been employed to examine group differences relative to peers from the general community. The aim of this study was to employ such a measure to determine differences in social inclusion between young adults with SMI and peers from the general community. Methods: A cross-sectional hierarchical logistic regression was conducted to identify which dimensions and individual indicators from the Filia Social Inclusion Measure (F-SIM) discriminated between n = 152 young adults aged 18–25 from the general community (M = 21.36, SD = 2.16) and n = 159 young adults aged 18–25 with SMI (M = 21.13, SD = 2.21). Results: Group membership was accounted for by Interpersonal Connections (Nagelkerke R2 =.32), Vocational & Financial Security (Nagelkerke R2 =.32) and Healthy Independent Lifestyle (Nagelkerke R2 =.08) dimensions of the F-SIM. Relative to young adults from the general community, those with SMI were five times less likely to feel they had friends who would call on them in a crisis, odds ratio (OR) =.19 (95%CI =.04,.53), p =.04, almost five times more likely to live with their parents, OR = 4.79 (95%CI = 1.98,11.15), p =.004, almost four times less likely to have worked/studied any time over the past 12 months, OR =.27 (95%CI =.11,.64), p <.001, and three-and-a-half times more likely to report unstable accommodation, OR = 3.58 (95%CI = 1.14, 11.15), p =.03. Conclusion: Young adults with SMI are socially excluded relative to peers from the general community in terms of interpersonal connections, vocational engagement, autonomy/independence and housing stability. In addition to the well-established focus on vocational engagement, interventions to improve social inclusion in this population must promote reciprocity within social relationships and healthy autonomy/independence (including stable housing).

AB - Aims: Young adults with serious mental illness (SMI) are thought to be socially excluded. However, psychometric measures of social inclusion have not been employed to examine group differences relative to peers from the general community. The aim of this study was to employ such a measure to determine differences in social inclusion between young adults with SMI and peers from the general community. Methods: A cross-sectional hierarchical logistic regression was conducted to identify which dimensions and individual indicators from the Filia Social Inclusion Measure (F-SIM) discriminated between n = 152 young adults aged 18–25 from the general community (M = 21.36, SD = 2.16) and n = 159 young adults aged 18–25 with SMI (M = 21.13, SD = 2.21). Results: Group membership was accounted for by Interpersonal Connections (Nagelkerke R2 =.32), Vocational & Financial Security (Nagelkerke R2 =.32) and Healthy Independent Lifestyle (Nagelkerke R2 =.08) dimensions of the F-SIM. Relative to young adults from the general community, those with SMI were five times less likely to feel they had friends who would call on them in a crisis, odds ratio (OR) =.19 (95%CI =.04,.53), p =.04, almost five times more likely to live with their parents, OR = 4.79 (95%CI = 1.98,11.15), p =.004, almost four times less likely to have worked/studied any time over the past 12 months, OR =.27 (95%CI =.11,.64), p <.001, and three-and-a-half times more likely to report unstable accommodation, OR = 3.58 (95%CI = 1.14, 11.15), p =.03. Conclusion: Young adults with SMI are socially excluded relative to peers from the general community in terms of interpersonal connections, vocational engagement, autonomy/independence and housing stability. In addition to the well-established focus on vocational engagement, interventions to improve social inclusion in this population must promote reciprocity within social relationships and healthy autonomy/independence (including stable housing).

KW - group difference

KW - mental illness

KW - social exclusion

KW - Social inclusion

KW - young adult

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DO - 10.1177/0020764019868749

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