Graduate entry students’ early perceptions of their future nursing careers

Lisa McKenna, Ingrid Brooks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Graduate entry nursing programs designed for individuals with prior degrees in other disciplines are becoming increasingly popular internationally. They provide entry into nursing for people with unique skill-sets. Yet, little is known about why these individuals choose career change into nursing and what they expect from their new careers. This component of a larger study sought to explore graduate entry nursing students’ short and longer term career intentions on commencement of their courses. A cross-sectional survey was used. Descriptive frequencies were used to analyse demographic data, while summative content analysis was used with the open-ended questions. Participants were drawn from eight cohorts of commencing students from enrolled in one graduate entry masters program in Australia between 2009 and 2015. Content analysis identified three main categories: professional role, work location, and work context. Longer term responses were categorised under four categories: professional role, work location, work context and personal and professional goals. Many students had clear directions about their future nursing careers. On graduation, many envisioned working in advanced roles or in clinical specialty areas, primarily in hospital settings. However, in the longer term, there was diversity among with many envisaging work outside traditional hospital settings, and some in other health disciplines.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)292-295
Number of pages4
JournalNurse Education in Practice
Volume28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Keywords

  • Career intention
  • Content analysis
  • Graduate entry
  • Nursing

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