Graduate employability

Views of recent chemistry graduates

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractOtherpeer-review

Abstract

Like many other countries, graduate employability is an important issue for higher education in Australia as there has been a significant decline over the past few years in the employment prospects of new graduates. This issue is additionally important due to the reported dissatisfaction of many employers with graduates’ ability to contribute effectively to the workplace. The Graduate Employability for Monash Science (GEMS) Project aims to explore the skills needs of recent Monash University science graduates and their employers and investigate how these can best be inculcated into Monash University undergraduate science curricula. While we have an understanding of what employers want from graduates, less is known how recent graduates view the usage of knowledge, skills and capabilities in the workplace and how well these were developed at university. Focusing on responses from graduates with a chemistry major, this paper will discuss: (a) if there is a mismatch between the knowledge and skills developed by chemistry graduates in their undergraduate study and those actually required in post-graduation activities, and (b) what they view the Monash University can do to better support employment for graduates. We will also discuss how we intend to reflect on the survey results and develop targeted interventions for Monash University chemistry undergraduate students that will enhance their employability in chemistry-based sectors beyond graduation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages49
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jul 2016
EventBiennial Conference on Chemical Education 2016 - University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, United States of America
Duration: 31 Jul 20164 Aug 2016

Conference

ConferenceBiennial Conference on Chemical Education 2016
Abbreviated titleBCCE 2016
CountryUnited States of America
CityGreeley
Period31/07/164/08/16

Cite this

Sarkar, M., Overton, T., Thompson, C., & Rayner, G. (2016). Graduate employability: Views of recent chemistry graduates. 49. Abstract from Biennial Conference on Chemical Education 2016, Greeley, United States of America.
Sarkar, Mahbub ; Overton, Tina ; Thompson, Christopher ; Rayner, Gerry. / Graduate employability : Views of recent chemistry graduates. Abstract from Biennial Conference on Chemical Education 2016, Greeley, United States of America.1 p.
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title = "Graduate employability: Views of recent chemistry graduates",
abstract = "Like many other countries, graduate employability is an important issue for higher education in Australia as there has been a significant decline over the past few years in the employment prospects of new graduates. This issue is additionally important due to the reported dissatisfaction of many employers with graduates’ ability to contribute effectively to the workplace. The Graduate Employability for Monash Science (GEMS) Project aims to explore the skills needs of recent Monash University science graduates and their employers and investigate how these can best be inculcated into Monash University undergraduate science curricula. While we have an understanding of what employers want from graduates, less is known how recent graduates view the usage of knowledge, skills and capabilities in the workplace and how well these were developed at university. Focusing on responses from graduates with a chemistry major, this paper will discuss: (a) if there is a mismatch between the knowledge and skills developed by chemistry graduates in their undergraduate study and those actually required in post-graduation activities, and (b) what they view the Monash University can do to better support employment for graduates. We will also discuss how we intend to reflect on the survey results and develop targeted interventions for Monash University chemistry undergraduate students that will enhance their employability in chemistry-based sectors beyond graduation.",
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Sarkar, M, Overton, T, Thompson, C & Rayner, G 2016, 'Graduate employability: Views of recent chemistry graduates' Biennial Conference on Chemical Education 2016, Greeley, United States of America, 31/07/16 - 4/08/16, pp. 49.

Graduate employability : Views of recent chemistry graduates. / Sarkar, Mahbub; Overton, Tina; Thompson, Christopher; Rayner, Gerry.

2016. 49 Abstract from Biennial Conference on Chemical Education 2016, Greeley, United States of America.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractOtherpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Graduate employability

T2 - Views of recent chemistry graduates

AU - Sarkar, Mahbub

AU - Overton, Tina

AU - Thompson, Christopher

AU - Rayner, Gerry

PY - 2016/7/31

Y1 - 2016/7/31

N2 - Like many other countries, graduate employability is an important issue for higher education in Australia as there has been a significant decline over the past few years in the employment prospects of new graduates. This issue is additionally important due to the reported dissatisfaction of many employers with graduates’ ability to contribute effectively to the workplace. The Graduate Employability for Monash Science (GEMS) Project aims to explore the skills needs of recent Monash University science graduates and their employers and investigate how these can best be inculcated into Monash University undergraduate science curricula. While we have an understanding of what employers want from graduates, less is known how recent graduates view the usage of knowledge, skills and capabilities in the workplace and how well these were developed at university. Focusing on responses from graduates with a chemistry major, this paper will discuss: (a) if there is a mismatch between the knowledge and skills developed by chemistry graduates in their undergraduate study and those actually required in post-graduation activities, and (b) what they view the Monash University can do to better support employment for graduates. We will also discuss how we intend to reflect on the survey results and develop targeted interventions for Monash University chemistry undergraduate students that will enhance their employability in chemistry-based sectors beyond graduation.

AB - Like many other countries, graduate employability is an important issue for higher education in Australia as there has been a significant decline over the past few years in the employment prospects of new graduates. This issue is additionally important due to the reported dissatisfaction of many employers with graduates’ ability to contribute effectively to the workplace. The Graduate Employability for Monash Science (GEMS) Project aims to explore the skills needs of recent Monash University science graduates and their employers and investigate how these can best be inculcated into Monash University undergraduate science curricula. While we have an understanding of what employers want from graduates, less is known how recent graduates view the usage of knowledge, skills and capabilities in the workplace and how well these were developed at university. Focusing on responses from graduates with a chemistry major, this paper will discuss: (a) if there is a mismatch between the knowledge and skills developed by chemistry graduates in their undergraduate study and those actually required in post-graduation activities, and (b) what they view the Monash University can do to better support employment for graduates. We will also discuss how we intend to reflect on the survey results and develop targeted interventions for Monash University chemistry undergraduate students that will enhance their employability in chemistry-based sectors beyond graduation.

M3 - Abstract

SP - 49

ER -

Sarkar M, Overton T, Thompson C, Rayner G. Graduate employability: Views of recent chemistry graduates. 2016. Abstract from Biennial Conference on Chemical Education 2016, Greeley, United States of America.