GP-OSMOTIC trial protocol: An individually randomised controlled trial to determine the effect of retrospective continuous glucose monitoring (r-CGM) on HbA1c in adults with type 2 diabetes in general practice (Protocol)

John Furler, David Norman O'Neal, Jane Speight, Irene Blackberry, Jo Anne Manski-Nankervis, Sharmala Thuraisingam, Katie De La Rue, Louise Ginnivan, Jessica Lea Browne, Elizabeth Holmes-Truscott, Kamlesh Khunti, Kim Dalziel, Jason Chiang, Ralph Audehm, Mark Kennedy, Malcolm Clark, Alicia Josephine Jenkins, Danny Liew, Philip Clarke, James Best

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction Optimal glycaemia can reduce type 2 diabetes (T2D) complications. Observing retrospective continuous glucose monitoring (r-CGM) patterns may prompt therapeutic changes but evidence for r-CGM use in T2D is limited. We describe the protocol for a randomised controlled trial (RCT) examining intermittent r-CGM use (up to 14 days every three months) in T2D in general practice (GP). Methods and analysis General Practice Optimising Structured MOnitoring To achieve Improved Clinical Outcomes is a two-arm RCT asking € does intermittent r-CGM in adults with T2D in primary care improve HbA1c?' Primary outcome Absolute difference in mean HbA1c at 12 months follow-up between intervention and control arms. Secondary outcomes: (a) r-CGM per cent time in target (4-10 mmol/L) range, at baseline and 12 months; (b) diabetes-specific distress (Problem Areas in Diabetes). Eligibility Aged 18-80 years, T2D for ≥1 year, a (past month) HbA1c>5.5 mmol/mol (0.5%) above their individualised target while prescribed at least two non-insulin hypoglycaemic therapies and/or insulin (therapy stable for the last four months). Our general glycaemic target is 53 mmol/mol (7%) (patients with a history of severe hypoglycaemia or a recorded diagnosis of hypoglycaemia unawareness will have a target of 64 mmol/mol (8%)). Our trial compares r-CGM use and usual care. The r-CGM report summarising daily glucose patterns will be reviewed by GP and patient and inform treatment decisions. Participants in both arms are provided with 1 hour education by a specialist diabetes nurse. The sample (n=150/arm) has 80% power to detect a mean HbA1c difference of 5.5 mmol/mol (0.5%) with an SD of 14.2 (1.3%) and alpha of 0.05 (allowing for 10% clinic and 20% patient attrition). Ethics and dissemination University of Melbourne Human Ethics Sub-Committee (ID 1647151.1). Dissemination will be in peer-reviewed journals, conferences and a plain-language summary for participants. Trial registration number >ACTRN12616001372471; Pre-results.

Original languageEnglish
Article number021435
JournalBMJ Open
Volume8
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2018

Keywords

  • clinical trials
  • primary care

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