Getting on with your computer is associated with job satisfaction in primary care: entrants to primary care should be assessed for their competency with electronic patient record systems

Simon de Lusignan, Christopher Pearce, Neil Munro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleOtherpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Job satisfaction in primary care is associated with getting on with your computer. Many primary care professionals spend longer interacting with their computer than anything else in their day. However, the computer often makes demands rather than be an aid or supporter that has learned its user's preferences. The use of electronic patient record (EPR) systems is underrepresented in the assessment of entrants to primary care, and in definitions of the core competencies of a family physician/general practitioner. We call for this to be put right: for the use of the EPR to support direct patient care and clinical governance to be given greater prominence in training and assessment. In parallel, policy makers should ensure that the EPR system use is orientated to ensuring patients receive evidence-based care, and EPR system suppliers should explore how their systems might better support their clinician users, in particular learning their preferences.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)i-iii
Number of pages3
JournalInformatics in Primary Care
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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