Getting Generation Y to attend: Friends, interactivity and half-time entertainment

David Hugh Blore Bednall, Michael J Valos, Stewart Adam, Colin McLeod

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

People from Generation Y, given their number and stage in the family life-cycle, represent a key emerging audience for major sports. The study focussed on the effect of friends and half time enhancements on likely attendance at matches. The sport domain was the Australian Football League (AFL), the elite Australian rules football competition. The enhancements being tested were half-time entertainments based on performers from well-known television talent shows, Australian Idol and It Takes Two. Scenarios with and without interactive participation, based on short messaging service (SMS) messages, were tested. The study used a general population sample of 909 Generation Y people in a traditional AFL market and one where AFL is not the major winter competition. Previous attendance and sport orientation were the major influences on attendance at major sports, including the AFL. Friends influenced likely attendance at a game, but no effects were found for half-time entertainments. People who attended matches with friends typically had social activities before and after the game. This suggested that one promotional strategy to expand existing markets was to find and engage the social networks of existing fans, making sport attendance a broader part of an overall social event.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80 - 90
Number of pages11
JournalSport Management Review
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Cite this

Bednall, David Hugh Blore ; Valos, Michael J ; Adam, Stewart ; McLeod, Colin. / Getting Generation Y to attend: Friends, interactivity and half-time entertainment. In: Sport Management Review. 2012 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 80 - 90.
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Getting Generation Y to attend: Friends, interactivity and half-time entertainment. / Bednall, David Hugh Blore; Valos, Michael J; Adam, Stewart; McLeod, Colin.

In: Sport Management Review, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2012, p. 80 - 90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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