Gestational age at birth affects maturation of baroreflex control

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

To assess the effect of prone sleeping, the major risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome, in the control of blood pressure (BP) in preterm infants born across a range of gestational ages. STUDY DESIGN: Daytime polysomnography was performed at 2-4 weeks, 2-3 months, and 5-6 months postterm age. The participants were 21 very preterm (mean gestation 29.4 +/- 0.3 weeks), 14 preterm (mean gestation 33.1 +/- 0.3 weeks), and 17 term (mean gestation 40.1 +/- 0.3 weeks). BP was measured via a Finometer cuff (Finapres Medical Systems, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) placed around the wrist. Data were recorded both supine and prone. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was calculated via cross-spectral analysis of spontaneous fluctuations in BP. RESULTS: BRS was lower in the prone position in very preterm infants at 2-4 weeks in active sleep (P <.05). Maturation of BRS was delayed in very preterm compared with both preterm and term infants. CONCLUSIONS: Maturation of BRS after term-equivalent age is altered in very preterm infants. Reduced BRS may result in an impaired ability of very preterm infants to respond to cardiovascular stress during infancy and may predispose them to cardiovascular disease later in life.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)559 - 565
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume166
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Cite this

@article{f475401b36084c62bcf6540143bf8afc,
title = "Gestational age at birth affects maturation of baroreflex control",
abstract = "To assess the effect of prone sleeping, the major risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome, in the control of blood pressure (BP) in preterm infants born across a range of gestational ages. STUDY DESIGN: Daytime polysomnography was performed at 2-4 weeks, 2-3 months, and 5-6 months postterm age. The participants were 21 very preterm (mean gestation 29.4 +/- 0.3 weeks), 14 preterm (mean gestation 33.1 +/- 0.3 weeks), and 17 term (mean gestation 40.1 +/- 0.3 weeks). BP was measured via a Finometer cuff (Finapres Medical Systems, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) placed around the wrist. Data were recorded both supine and prone. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was calculated via cross-spectral analysis of spontaneous fluctuations in BP. RESULTS: BRS was lower in the prone position in very preterm infants at 2-4 weeks in active sleep (P <.05). Maturation of BRS was delayed in very preterm compared with both preterm and term infants. CONCLUSIONS: Maturation of BRS after term-equivalent age is altered in very preterm infants. Reduced BRS may result in an impaired ability of very preterm infants to respond to cardiovascular stress during infancy and may predispose them to cardiovascular disease later in life.",
author = "Karinna Fyfe and Stephanie Yiallourou and Wong, {Flora Yuen-Wait} and Alexsandria Odoi and Walker, {Adrian Mark} and Horne, {Rosemary Sylvia Claire}",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.11.026",
language = "English",
volume = "166",
pages = "559 -- 565",
journal = "Journal of Pediatrics",
issn = "0022-3476",
publisher = "Mosby International",
number = "3",

}

Gestational age at birth affects maturation of baroreflex control. / Fyfe, Karinna; Yiallourou, Stephanie; Wong, Flora Yuen-Wait; Odoi, Alexsandria; Walker, Adrian Mark; Horne, Rosemary Sylvia Claire.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 166, No. 3, 2015, p. 559 - 565.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gestational age at birth affects maturation of baroreflex control

AU - Fyfe, Karinna

AU - Yiallourou, Stephanie

AU - Wong, Flora Yuen-Wait

AU - Odoi, Alexsandria

AU - Walker, Adrian Mark

AU - Horne, Rosemary Sylvia Claire

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - To assess the effect of prone sleeping, the major risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome, in the control of blood pressure (BP) in preterm infants born across a range of gestational ages. STUDY DESIGN: Daytime polysomnography was performed at 2-4 weeks, 2-3 months, and 5-6 months postterm age. The participants were 21 very preterm (mean gestation 29.4 +/- 0.3 weeks), 14 preterm (mean gestation 33.1 +/- 0.3 weeks), and 17 term (mean gestation 40.1 +/- 0.3 weeks). BP was measured via a Finometer cuff (Finapres Medical Systems, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) placed around the wrist. Data were recorded both supine and prone. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was calculated via cross-spectral analysis of spontaneous fluctuations in BP. RESULTS: BRS was lower in the prone position in very preterm infants at 2-4 weeks in active sleep (P <.05). Maturation of BRS was delayed in very preterm compared with both preterm and term infants. CONCLUSIONS: Maturation of BRS after term-equivalent age is altered in very preterm infants. Reduced BRS may result in an impaired ability of very preterm infants to respond to cardiovascular stress during infancy and may predispose them to cardiovascular disease later in life.

AB - To assess the effect of prone sleeping, the major risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome, in the control of blood pressure (BP) in preterm infants born across a range of gestational ages. STUDY DESIGN: Daytime polysomnography was performed at 2-4 weeks, 2-3 months, and 5-6 months postterm age. The participants were 21 very preterm (mean gestation 29.4 +/- 0.3 weeks), 14 preterm (mean gestation 33.1 +/- 0.3 weeks), and 17 term (mean gestation 40.1 +/- 0.3 weeks). BP was measured via a Finometer cuff (Finapres Medical Systems, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) placed around the wrist. Data were recorded both supine and prone. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was calculated via cross-spectral analysis of spontaneous fluctuations in BP. RESULTS: BRS was lower in the prone position in very preterm infants at 2-4 weeks in active sleep (P <.05). Maturation of BRS was delayed in very preterm compared with both preterm and term infants. CONCLUSIONS: Maturation of BRS after term-equivalent age is altered in very preterm infants. Reduced BRS may result in an impaired ability of very preterm infants to respond to cardiovascular stress during infancy and may predispose them to cardiovascular disease later in life.

UR - http://goo.gl/Z2JwYk

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.11.026

DO - 10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.11.026

M3 - Article

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SP - 559

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JO - Journal of Pediatrics

JF - Journal of Pediatrics

SN - 0022-3476

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ER -