Geobiology of in situ uranium leaching

Carla M Zammit, Kan Li, Barbara Etschmann, Joël Brugger, Frank Reith

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Driven by the world's thirst for energy, the demand for uranium is rapidly increasing. Hence, producers of uranium are struggling to keep up with demands and are exploring more costeffective methods of extraction. Uranium is currently mined via open pit and underground mining as well as with in situ leaching methods, with in situ leaching currently accounting for approximately 45% of total uranium production. Studies have shown that the presence of uranium in soils strongly affects the composition and function of resident microbial communities. In view of the close association of biological processes and uranium geochemistry, it is surprising how little information is available on the effect of microbial communities on in situ leaching. Hence, this review focuses on the possibility to exploit the properties of such microorganisms and identify opportunities to use natural microbial processes to improve uranium recovery and mine site rehabilitation.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIntegration of Scientific and Industrial Knowledge on Biohydrometallurgy
PublisherTrans Tech Publications
Pages372-375
Number of pages4
Volume825
ISBN (Print)9783037858912
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes
EventInternational Biohydrometallurgy Symposium (IBS) 2013 - Antofagasta, Chile
Duration: 8 Oct 201311 Oct 2013
Conference number: 20th
https://www.scientific.net/AMR.825.-5.pdf (Frontmatter)

Publication series

NameAdvanced Materials Research
Volume825
ISSN (Print)10226680

Conference

ConferenceInternational Biohydrometallurgy Symposium (IBS) 2013
Abbreviated titleIBS 2013
CountryChile
CityAntofagasta
Period8/10/1311/10/13
OtherProceedings
Advanced Materials Research (Vol 825)
Integration of Scientific and Industrial Knowledge on Biohydrometallurgy
Internet address

Keywords

  • Geobiology
  • In situ
  • Leaching
  • Uranium

Cite this

Zammit, C. M., Li, K., Etschmann, B., Brugger, J., & Reith, F. (2013). Geobiology of in situ uranium leaching. In Integration of Scientific and Industrial Knowledge on Biohydrometallurgy (Vol. 825, pp. 372-375). (Advanced Materials Research; Vol. 825). Trans Tech Publications. https://doi.org/10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMR.825.372
Zammit, Carla M ; Li, Kan ; Etschmann, Barbara ; Brugger, Joël ; Reith, Frank. / Geobiology of in situ uranium leaching. Integration of Scientific and Industrial Knowledge on Biohydrometallurgy. Vol. 825 Trans Tech Publications, 2013. pp. 372-375 (Advanced Materials Research).
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Zammit, CM, Li, K, Etschmann, B, Brugger, J & Reith, F 2013, Geobiology of in situ uranium leaching. in Integration of Scientific and Industrial Knowledge on Biohydrometallurgy. vol. 825, Advanced Materials Research, vol. 825, Trans Tech Publications, pp. 372-375, International Biohydrometallurgy Symposium (IBS) 2013, Antofagasta, Chile, 8/10/13. https://doi.org/10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMR.825.372

Geobiology of in situ uranium leaching. / Zammit, Carla M; Li, Kan; Etschmann, Barbara; Brugger, Joël; Reith, Frank.

Integration of Scientific and Industrial Knowledge on Biohydrometallurgy. Vol. 825 Trans Tech Publications, 2013. p. 372-375 (Advanced Materials Research; Vol. 825).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

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Zammit CM, Li K, Etschmann B, Brugger J, Reith F. Geobiology of in situ uranium leaching. In Integration of Scientific and Industrial Knowledge on Biohydrometallurgy. Vol. 825. Trans Tech Publications. 2013. p. 372-375. (Advanced Materials Research). https://doi.org/10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMR.825.372