Functional molar macrowear analysis in Pongo pygmaeus and Pongo abelii

Rachael Blanchard, D, Rex Mitchel, Ada Klinkhamer, Luca Fiorenza

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractOtherpeer-review

Abstract

Orangutans are found in Southeast Asian tropical rainforest of Borneo (Pongo pygmaeus) and Sumatra (Pongo abelii) and are primarily considered as frugivorous species. However, in seasonal periods when fruit availability is scarce, orangutans tend to eat fibrous and unripe fruits, leaves, nuts, bark, and in rare occasion, wood [1]. The highly seasonal environments, and fruit availability, seem to play an important evolutionary role in shaping the craniodental morphology in Pongo [1]. In fact, while Bornean orangutans, spend more time feeding on fallback foods (those seasonal foods with poor nutritional values and which are more difficult to digest), Sumatran populations consume more ripe fruit pulp. As a consequence, Bornean orangutans are characterised by relatively more robust mandibles, providing greater load resistance abilities to masticatory forces [2].
The aim of this study is to analyse the molar macrowear pattern of Bornean (Pongo pygmaeus) and Sumatran (Pongo abelii) orangutans, and thus investigate if there is any geographic variation in diet between the two species. We employ a well-established method known as Occlusal Fingerprint Analysis [3], that allows the three-dimensional reconstruction of the occlusal movements responsible for the formation of wear facets, those flat and polished enamel areas with well-defined borders. This approach considers the functional aspects of tooth macrowear (buccal phase I, lingual phase I and phase II facets) that occur during the sequential phases of the chewing cycle, or power stroke [4].
The sample consists of second mandibular molars (which provide a good general overview of the development of masticatory functions within a species) of P. pygmaeus (n = 9) and P. abelii (n = 8), characterised by a moderate degree of wear, between stages 2 and 3 [5].
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2019
EventAnnual Meeting of the European Society for the study of Human Evolution (ESHE 2019) - Palais des Congrès, Liege, Belgium
Duration: 19 Sep 201921 Sep 2019
Conference number: 9th
https://www.eshe.eu/meetings.html

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Meeting of the European Society for the study of Human Evolution (ESHE 2019)
Abbreviated titleESHE 2019
CountryBelgium
CityLiege
Period19/09/1921/09/19
Internet address

Keywords

  • Primatology
  • Dental anthropology
  • Ecology
  • Orangutans
  • Palaeodiet

Cite this

Blanchard, R., Mitchel, D. R., Klinkhamer, A., & Fiorenza, L. (2019). Functional molar macrowear analysis in Pongo pygmaeus and Pongo abelii. Abstract from Annual Meeting of the European Society for the study of Human Evolution (ESHE 2019), Liege, Belgium.
Blanchard, Rachael ; Mitchel, D, Rex ; Klinkhamer, Ada ; Fiorenza, Luca. / Functional molar macrowear analysis in Pongo pygmaeus and Pongo abelii. Abstract from Annual Meeting of the European Society for the study of Human Evolution (ESHE 2019), Liege, Belgium.
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author = "Rachael Blanchard and Mitchel, {D, Rex} and Ada Klinkhamer and Luca Fiorenza",
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language = "English",
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Blanchard, R, Mitchel, DR, Klinkhamer, A & Fiorenza, L 2019, 'Functional molar macrowear analysis in Pongo pygmaeus and Pongo abelii' Annual Meeting of the European Society for the study of Human Evolution (ESHE 2019), Liege, Belgium, 19/09/19 - 21/09/19, .

Functional molar macrowear analysis in Pongo pygmaeus and Pongo abelii. / Blanchard, Rachael; Mitchel, D, Rex; Klinkhamer, Ada; Fiorenza, Luca.

2019. Abstract from Annual Meeting of the European Society for the study of Human Evolution (ESHE 2019), Liege, Belgium.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractOtherpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Functional molar macrowear analysis in Pongo pygmaeus and Pongo abelii

AU - Blanchard, Rachael

AU - Mitchel, D, Rex

AU - Klinkhamer, Ada

AU - Fiorenza, Luca

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Orangutans are found in Southeast Asian tropical rainforest of Borneo (Pongo pygmaeus) and Sumatra (Pongo abelii) and are primarily considered as frugivorous species. However, in seasonal periods when fruit availability is scarce, orangutans tend to eat fibrous and unripe fruits, leaves, nuts, bark, and in rare occasion, wood [1]. The highly seasonal environments, and fruit availability, seem to play an important evolutionary role in shaping the craniodental morphology in Pongo [1]. In fact, while Bornean orangutans, spend more time feeding on fallback foods (those seasonal foods with poor nutritional values and which are more difficult to digest), Sumatran populations consume more ripe fruit pulp. As a consequence, Bornean orangutans are characterised by relatively more robust mandibles, providing greater load resistance abilities to masticatory forces [2].The aim of this study is to analyse the molar macrowear pattern of Bornean (Pongo pygmaeus) and Sumatran (Pongo abelii) orangutans, and thus investigate if there is any geographic variation in diet between the two species. We employ a well-established method known as Occlusal Fingerprint Analysis [3], that allows the three-dimensional reconstruction of the occlusal movements responsible for the formation of wear facets, those flat and polished enamel areas with well-defined borders. This approach considers the functional aspects of tooth macrowear (buccal phase I, lingual phase I and phase II facets) that occur during the sequential phases of the chewing cycle, or power stroke [4]. The sample consists of second mandibular molars (which provide a good general overview of the development of masticatory functions within a species) of P. pygmaeus (n = 9) and P. abelii (n = 8), characterised by a moderate degree of wear, between stages 2 and 3 [5].

AB - Orangutans are found in Southeast Asian tropical rainforest of Borneo (Pongo pygmaeus) and Sumatra (Pongo abelii) and are primarily considered as frugivorous species. However, in seasonal periods when fruit availability is scarce, orangutans tend to eat fibrous and unripe fruits, leaves, nuts, bark, and in rare occasion, wood [1]. The highly seasonal environments, and fruit availability, seem to play an important evolutionary role in shaping the craniodental morphology in Pongo [1]. In fact, while Bornean orangutans, spend more time feeding on fallback foods (those seasonal foods with poor nutritional values and which are more difficult to digest), Sumatran populations consume more ripe fruit pulp. As a consequence, Bornean orangutans are characterised by relatively more robust mandibles, providing greater load resistance abilities to masticatory forces [2].The aim of this study is to analyse the molar macrowear pattern of Bornean (Pongo pygmaeus) and Sumatran (Pongo abelii) orangutans, and thus investigate if there is any geographic variation in diet between the two species. We employ a well-established method known as Occlusal Fingerprint Analysis [3], that allows the three-dimensional reconstruction of the occlusal movements responsible for the formation of wear facets, those flat and polished enamel areas with well-defined borders. This approach considers the functional aspects of tooth macrowear (buccal phase I, lingual phase I and phase II facets) that occur during the sequential phases of the chewing cycle, or power stroke [4]. The sample consists of second mandibular molars (which provide a good general overview of the development of masticatory functions within a species) of P. pygmaeus (n = 9) and P. abelii (n = 8), characterised by a moderate degree of wear, between stages 2 and 3 [5].

KW - Primatology

KW - Dental anthropology

KW - Ecology

KW - Orangutans

KW - Palaeodiet

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Blanchard R, Mitchel DR, Klinkhamer A, Fiorenza L. Functional molar macrowear analysis in Pongo pygmaeus and Pongo abelii. 2019. Abstract from Annual Meeting of the European Society for the study of Human Evolution (ESHE 2019), Liege, Belgium.