Frequency, specialization, and violence in offending careers

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

119 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Do frequent, violent offenders possess the same characteristics as frequent, nonviolent offenders? Although only a few studies have examined this question, a few limitations reduce the generalizability of the findings. In an effort to overcome some of those limitations, this article uses data from the Philadelphia Collaborative Perinatal Project to examine two interrelated questions. First, do frequent, violent offenders possess the same characteristics as frequent, nonviolent offenders? Second, is there specificity or generality in violence? In general, the results suggest that frequent, violent offenders are indistinguishable from frequent, nonviolent offenders and that involvement in violence is primarily a function of increasing offense frequency; that is, there is no tendency to specialize in violence. Implications for future theoretical research are addressed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)392-418
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Research in Crime and Delinquency
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2000
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

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Frequency, specialization, and violence in offending careers. / Piquero, A.

In: Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, Vol. 37, No. 4, 01.01.2000, p. 392-418.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

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