Food cooking methods contribute to the reduced vitamin C content of foods prepared in hospitals and care facilities

a systematic review

Emma Armstrong, Rachel Jamieson, Judi Porter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Recent cases of scurvy within health care have been reported internationally. One potential reason is vitamin C losses associated with food cooking methods. This review systematically synthesised the published literature to determine the extent that vitamin C in food is lost secondary to food cooking methods used in hospitals or care facilities. The review followed Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, and was prospectively registered in the Prospective Register for Systematic Reviews. Searches were run in three databases with no date restrictions, complemented by an internet search and reference checking. Search terms focused on the intervention and outcome. The final review included seven publications including longitudinal studies and comparison to reference standards. All studies identified vitamin C losses between preparation and service resulting from food cooking methods. Quality was rated as positive for four papers and neutral for the remainder of the included library.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-299
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Food Science and Technology
Volume54
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Ascorbic acid
  • cook-chill
  • food service
  • scurvy
  • vitamin C

Cite this

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Food cooking methods contribute to the reduced vitamin C content of foods prepared in hospitals and care facilities : a systematic review. / Armstrong, Emma; Jamieson, Rachel; Porter, Judi.

In: International Journal of Food Science and Technology, Vol. 54, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 291-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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