Flow field interactions between two tandem cyclists

Nathan Barry, David Burton, John Sheridan, Mark Thompson, Nicholas A. T. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Aerodynamic drag is the primary resistive force acting on cyclists at racing speeds. Many events involve cyclists travelling in very close proximity. Previous studies have shown that interactions result in significant drag reductions for inline cyclists. However, the interaction between cyclist leg position (pedalling) and the vortical flow structures that contribute significantly to the drag on an isolated cyclist has not previously been quantified or described for tandem cyclists of varying separation. To this end, scale model cyclists were constructed for testing in a water channel for inline tandem configurations. Particle image velocimetry was used to capture time-averaged velocity fields around two tandem cyclists. Perhaps surprisingly, the wake of a trailing cyclist maintains strong similarity to the characteristic wake of a single cyclist despite a significant disturbance to the upstream flow. Together with streamwise velocity measurements through the wake and upstream of the trailing cyclist, this work supports previous findings, which showed that the trailing cyclist drag reduction is primarily due to upstream sheltering effects reducing the stagnation pressure on forward-facing surfaces.

Original languageEnglish
Article number181
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalExperiments in Fluids
Volume57
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2016

Cite this

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Flow field interactions between two tandem cyclists. / Barry, Nathan; Burton, David; Sheridan, John; Thompson, Mark; Brown, Nicholas A. T.

In: Experiments in Fluids, Vol. 57, No. 12, 181, 01.12.2016, p. 1-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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