Five years of taps on shoulders to PATS on backs in ICT

Angela Carbone, Bella Ross, Jason David Ceddia

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A concern for Information and Communication Technology [1] and Engineering disciplines in many Australian universities is the need to improve a high percentage of courses that students perceive as needing critical attention. Typically, courses in the Physical Sciences disciplines score low on student evaluations and repeatedly have the highest student dropout rates. This paper reports the results of a study investigating five years of changes in course evaluation results in one of Australia s Go8 universities that applied the Peer Assisted Teaching Scheme (PATS). PATS was initially trialed in the Faculty of Information Technology (FIT) at Monash University to improve teaching quality and student satisfaction through building peer assistance capacity. The focus of this study will be on student satisfaction, rather than education quality. PATS has evolved over this period through action research and has been supported by the Australian Government s Office for Learning and Teaching. Multiple changes have been made to the PATS process since its inception, and the quantitative improvements to courses taking part in PATS are reported. The paper concludes by showing that the course areas addressed by the PATS participants are indeed the areas of most concern to students.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE 2013)
Subtitle of host publication1-3 July 2013, University of Kent, Canterbury, England
EditorsMichael Goldweber
Place of PublicationNew York, USA
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Pages195 - 200
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9781450320788
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
EventAnnual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education 2013 - University of Kent, Canterbury, United Kingdom
Duration: 1 Jul 20133 Jul 2013
Conference number: 18th
https://www.cs.kent.ac.uk/events/iticse2013/

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education 2013
Abbreviated titleITiCSE 2013
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityCanterbury
Period1/07/133/07/13
OtherITiCSE 2013, the 18th Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education will be held at the University of Kent at Canterbury, United Kingdom, and is hosted by the University of Kent. The conference is sponsored by the ACM Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE). The program of the conference will consist of keynote lectures, paper sessions, working groups, exhibits, panels, posters, courseware demonstrations, tips, techniques and courseware.
Internet address

Cite this

Carbone, A., Ross, B., & Ceddia, J. D. (2013). Five years of taps on shoulders to PATS on backs in ICT. In M. Goldweber (Ed.), Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE 2013): 1-3 July 2013, University of Kent, Canterbury, England (pp. 195 - 200). New York, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). https://doi.org/10.1145/2462476.2465581
Carbone, Angela ; Ross, Bella ; Ceddia, Jason David. / Five years of taps on shoulders to PATS on backs in ICT. Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE 2013): 1-3 July 2013, University of Kent, Canterbury, England. editor / Michael Goldweber. New York, USA : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013. pp. 195 - 200
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Carbone, A, Ross, B & Ceddia, JD 2013, Five years of taps on shoulders to PATS on backs in ICT. in M Goldweber (ed.), Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE 2013): 1-3 July 2013, University of Kent, Canterbury, England. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), New York, USA, pp. 195 - 200, Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education 2013, Canterbury, United Kingdom, 1/07/13. https://doi.org/10.1145/2462476.2465581

Five years of taps on shoulders to PATS on backs in ICT. / Carbone, Angela; Ross, Bella; Ceddia, Jason David.

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE 2013): 1-3 July 2013, University of Kent, Canterbury, England. ed. / Michael Goldweber. New York, USA : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013. p. 195 - 200.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

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Carbone A, Ross B, Ceddia JD. Five years of taps on shoulders to PATS on backs in ICT. In Goldweber M, editor, Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE 2013): 1-3 July 2013, University of Kent, Canterbury, England. New York, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). 2013. p. 195 - 200 https://doi.org/10.1145/2462476.2465581