Five lenses for designing exertion experiences

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17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The field of HCI has increasingly looked at ways to support the physically active human being, however, new work suggests that the field has only begun to understand the many virtues of exertion. To further the field, we present a set of five design lenses extended primarily from sports philosophy literature to help approach exertion not just as a means of deferring death, but also as an opportunity for personal growth. The lenses facilitate learning how to appreciate a void (Reverie), welcome pleasure (Pleasure), become humble (Humility), as well as be fearful and excited simultaneously (Sublime), whilst being more carefully aware of one's own body (Oneness). Using these lenses, we articulate associated technology opportunities through related work as well as our own craft knowledge. With our work, we aim to support designers who want to facilitate the many virtues of exertion so that ultimately more people profit from the many benefits of being physically active.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
EditorsCliff Lampe, m.c. schraefel
Place of PublicationNew York NY USA
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Pages2473-2487
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9781450346559
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes
EventInternational Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2017 - Colorado Convention Center, Denver, United States of America
Duration: 6 May 201711 May 2017
Conference number: 35th
https://chi2017.acm.org/
https://dl.acm.org/doi/proceedings/10.1145/3025453 (Proceedings)

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2017
Abbreviated titleCHI 2017
CountryUnited States of America
CityDenver
Period6/05/1711/05/17
Internet address

Keywords

  • Exergame
  • Exertion games
  • Exertion interface
  • Movement-based interaction
  • Sport
  • Whole-body interaction

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