Fanning as an alternative to air conditioning – a sustainable solution for reducing indoor occupational heat stress

Ollie Jay, Roman Hoelzl, Jana Weets, Nathan Morris, Timothy English, Lars Nybo, Jianlei Niu, Richard de Dear, Anthony Capon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We assessed whether increasing airflow with an electric fan is similarly effective as decreasing air temperature with air cooling (AC) in preventing heat-related reductions in productivity, and elevations in body temperatures and discomfort in a warm/humid indoor environment. In 48 experimental trials, we compared the reduction in the human heat stress response of sixteen participants during 135 min of intermittent arm ergometry at a fixed heart rate of 110 beats min −1 , from a simulated tropical environment (HOT; 30 °C, 70%RH; wind < 0.2 m s −1 ) to that observed with either a, (i) 7 °C reduction in air temperature (AC; 23 °C, 70%RH, wind < 0.2 m s −1 ); or (ii) facilitated airflow (FAN; 30 °C, 70%RH, wind = 4.2 m s −1 ). Cumulative work was similarly improved (+11%) by FAN compared to AC. Likewise, reductions in rectal temperature, thermal sensation, and thermal discomfort were similar with the two different cooling strategies. Sweat losses in the FAN trial were higher compared to AC but lower than HOT without fanning. In conclusion, fanning offers an effective method for alleviating thermal stress and preventing productivity losses for workers exposed to environmental heat. Moving air instead of chilling it may require a little more sweating, but it can save electricity and hence lower greenhouse gas emissions compared to AC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-98
Number of pages7
JournalEnergy and Buildings
Volume193
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Climate
  • Convection
  • Energy conservation
  • Evaporation
  • Occupational heat stress

Cite this

Jay, Ollie ; Hoelzl, Roman ; Weets, Jana ; Morris, Nathan ; English, Timothy ; Nybo, Lars ; Niu, Jianlei ; de Dear, Richard ; Capon, Anthony. / Fanning as an alternative to air conditioning – a sustainable solution for reducing indoor occupational heat stress. In: Energy and Buildings. 2019 ; Vol. 193. pp. 92-98.
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abstract = "We assessed whether increasing airflow with an electric fan is similarly effective as decreasing air temperature with air cooling (AC) in preventing heat-related reductions in productivity, and elevations in body temperatures and discomfort in a warm/humid indoor environment. In 48 experimental trials, we compared the reduction in the human heat stress response of sixteen participants during 135 min of intermittent arm ergometry at a fixed heart rate of 110 beats min −1 , from a simulated tropical environment (HOT; 30 °C, 70{\%}RH; wind < 0.2 m s −1 ) to that observed with either a, (i) 7 °C reduction in air temperature (AC; 23 °C, 70{\%}RH, wind < 0.2 m s −1 ); or (ii) facilitated airflow (FAN; 30 °C, 70{\%}RH, wind = 4.2 m s −1 ). Cumulative work was similarly improved (+11{\%}) by FAN compared to AC. Likewise, reductions in rectal temperature, thermal sensation, and thermal discomfort were similar with the two different cooling strategies. Sweat losses in the FAN trial were higher compared to AC but lower than HOT without fanning. In conclusion, fanning offers an effective method for alleviating thermal stress and preventing productivity losses for workers exposed to environmental heat. Moving air instead of chilling it may require a little more sweating, but it can save electricity and hence lower greenhouse gas emissions compared to AC.",
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Fanning as an alternative to air conditioning – a sustainable solution for reducing indoor occupational heat stress. / Jay, Ollie; Hoelzl, Roman; Weets, Jana; Morris, Nathan; English, Timothy; Nybo, Lars; Niu, Jianlei; de Dear, Richard; Capon, Anthony.

In: Energy and Buildings, Vol. 193, 15.06.2019, p. 92-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Hoelzl, Roman

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AU - English, Timothy

AU - Nybo, Lars

AU - Niu, Jianlei

AU - de Dear, Richard

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