Factors associated with nicotine replacement therapy use among hospitalised smokers

Chang Yue Chui, Dennis Thomas, Simone Taylor, Billie Bonevski, Michael J. Abramson, Eldho Paul, Susan G. Poole, Gregory R. Weeks, Michael J. Dooley, Johnson George

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction and Aims: Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is recommended as a smoking cessation aid for hospitalised smokers. We examined factors associated with NRT use during hospitalisation and after discharge, and NRT uptake when systematically offered free of cost. 

Design and Methods: A nested analysis was conducted using data from a clinical trial that evaluated the effectiveness of a pharmacist-led smoking cessation intervention in 600 hospitalised smokers. 

Results: NRT was used at least once by 285 (48%) participants during hospitalisation and by 287 (48%) participants during the 12months post-discharge. Heavy smokers and those who expressed interest in using NRT for their next quit attempt at baseline interview were more likely to use NRT during hospitalisation [odds ratio (OR) 1.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.38, 2.74; OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.48, 2.95] and after discharge (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.20, 2.41; OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.39, 2.79). Those using six or more medications were more likely to use NRT during hospitalisation (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.05, 2.61). Post-discharge NRT users were more likely to have been initially admitted for a respiratory or cardiac problem (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.05, 2.18). When NRT was offered free of cost to a subset of patients (n=300), 157 (52%) used NRT during hospitalisation. Nicotine dependence and interest in using NRT predicted its use (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.38, 3.70; OR 2.58, 95% CI 1.58, 4.20). 

Discussion and Conclusions: Targeting heavy smokers, those with cardio-respiratory conditions and those interested in using NRT regardless of regimen complexity could improve NRT uptake.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)514-519
Number of pages5
JournalDrug and Alcohol Review
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

Keywords

  • Hospitalisation
  • Nicotine replacement therapy
  • Smoking
  • Smoking cessation

Cite this

Chui, Chang Yue ; Thomas, Dennis ; Taylor, Simone ; Bonevski, Billie ; Abramson, Michael J. ; Paul, Eldho ; Poole, Susan G. ; Weeks, Gregory R. ; Dooley, Michael J. ; George, Johnson. / Factors associated with nicotine replacement therapy use among hospitalised smokers. In: Drug and Alcohol Review. 2018 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 514-519.
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title = "Factors associated with nicotine replacement therapy use among hospitalised smokers",
abstract = "Introduction and Aims: Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is recommended as a smoking cessation aid for hospitalised smokers. We examined factors associated with NRT use during hospitalisation and after discharge, and NRT uptake when systematically offered free of cost. Design and Methods: A nested analysis was conducted using data from a clinical trial that evaluated the effectiveness of a pharmacist-led smoking cessation intervention in 600 hospitalised smokers. Results: NRT was used at least once by 285 (48{\%}) participants during hospitalisation and by 287 (48{\%}) participants during the 12months post-discharge. Heavy smokers and those who expressed interest in using NRT for their next quit attempt at baseline interview were more likely to use NRT during hospitalisation [odds ratio (OR) 1.94, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 1.38, 2.74; OR 2.09, 95{\%} CI 1.48, 2.95] and after discharge (OR 1.70, 95{\%} CI 1.20, 2.41; OR 1.97, 95{\%} CI 1.39, 2.79). Those using six or more medications were more likely to use NRT during hospitalisation (OR 1.65, 95{\%} CI 1.05, 2.61). Post-discharge NRT users were more likely to have been initially admitted for a respiratory or cardiac problem (OR 1.51, 95{\%} CI 1.05, 2.18). When NRT was offered free of cost to a subset of patients (n=300), 157 (52{\%}) used NRT during hospitalisation. Nicotine dependence and interest in using NRT predicted its use (OR 2.26, 95{\%} CI 1.38, 3.70; OR 2.58, 95{\%} CI 1.58, 4.20). Discussion and Conclusions: Targeting heavy smokers, those with cardio-respiratory conditions and those interested in using NRT regardless of regimen complexity could improve NRT uptake.",
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Factors associated with nicotine replacement therapy use among hospitalised smokers. / Chui, Chang Yue; Thomas, Dennis; Taylor, Simone; Bonevski, Billie; Abramson, Michael J.; Paul, Eldho; Poole, Susan G.; Weeks, Gregory R.; Dooley, Michael J.; George, Johnson.

In: Drug and Alcohol Review, Vol. 37, No. 4, 05.2018, p. 514-519.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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