Faces of opposition: Juvenile resistance, high treason and the People's Court in Nazi Germany

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Analysis of the sixty-nine juveniles tried for high treason before the People s Court in Nazi Germany between 1933 and 1945, based on the available court records, finds that juvenile resistance in Nazi Germany possessed a distinct form and character; it was a phenomenon rather than an exceptional act. Juvenile resisters charged with high treason were typically working-class males of German ethnicity, motivated primarily by left-wing and religious beliefs, acting in small groups free of significant adult supervision and direction. Examination of the verdicts and sentencing of these juvenile resisters sheds light on how the Nazi justice system reacted to such serious internal resistance from its young.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209 - 234
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Interdisciplinary History
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Cite this

@article{f5c4a5b60d13447bba9a2db17e35fdaf,
title = "Faces of opposition: Juvenile resistance, high treason and the People's Court in Nazi Germany",
abstract = "Analysis of the sixty-nine juveniles tried for high treason before the People s Court in Nazi Germany between 1933 and 1945, based on the available court records, finds that juvenile resistance in Nazi Germany possessed a distinct form and character; it was a phenomenon rather than an exceptional act. Juvenile resisters charged with high treason were typically working-class males of German ethnicity, motivated primarily by left-wing and religious beliefs, acting in small groups free of significant adult supervision and direction. Examination of the verdicts and sentencing of these juvenile resisters sheds light on how the Nazi justice system reacted to such serious internal resistance from its young.",
author = "Wayne Geerling and Magee, {Gary Bryan} and Brooks, {Robert Darren}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1162/JINH_a_00537",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "209 -- 234",
journal = "Journal of Interdisciplinary History",
issn = "0022-1953",
publisher = "Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press",
number = "2",

}

Faces of opposition: Juvenile resistance, high treason and the People's Court in Nazi Germany. / Geerling, Wayne; Magee, Gary Bryan; Brooks, Robert Darren.

In: Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 44, No. 2, 2013, p. 209 - 234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Faces of opposition: Juvenile resistance, high treason and the People's Court in Nazi Germany

AU - Geerling, Wayne

AU - Magee, Gary Bryan

AU - Brooks, Robert Darren

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Analysis of the sixty-nine juveniles tried for high treason before the People s Court in Nazi Germany between 1933 and 1945, based on the available court records, finds that juvenile resistance in Nazi Germany possessed a distinct form and character; it was a phenomenon rather than an exceptional act. Juvenile resisters charged with high treason were typically working-class males of German ethnicity, motivated primarily by left-wing and religious beliefs, acting in small groups free of significant adult supervision and direction. Examination of the verdicts and sentencing of these juvenile resisters sheds light on how the Nazi justice system reacted to such serious internal resistance from its young.

AB - Analysis of the sixty-nine juveniles tried for high treason before the People s Court in Nazi Germany between 1933 and 1945, based on the available court records, finds that juvenile resistance in Nazi Germany possessed a distinct form and character; it was a phenomenon rather than an exceptional act. Juvenile resisters charged with high treason were typically working-class males of German ethnicity, motivated primarily by left-wing and religious beliefs, acting in small groups free of significant adult supervision and direction. Examination of the verdicts and sentencing of these juvenile resisters sheds light on how the Nazi justice system reacted to such serious internal resistance from its young.

U2 - 10.1162/JINH_a_00537

DO - 10.1162/JINH_a_00537

M3 - Article

VL - 44

SP - 209

EP - 234

JO - Journal of Interdisciplinary History

JF - Journal of Interdisciplinary History

SN - 0022-1953

IS - 2

ER -