Exposure to the American flag polarizes democratic-republican ideologies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Some prior research has suggested that exposure to the American flag tilts Americans towards Republicanism, while others have proffered that it brings outs a common 'together' perspective instead. We explore a third possibility - that it may actually polarize Americans' political ideology. It is generally accepted that exposure to an environmental cue can shift attitudes and behaviours, at least partly or temporarily, in a manner that is consistent with that cue. Yet, the same cue can mean different things to different people. In the same vein, given how national identity and political ideology are intertwined in the United States, we hypothesize that the American flag should heighten different political beliefs depending on individuals' political ideology. To Democrats, being American is to support Democratic values, but to Republicans, being American is to support Republican values. The American flag thus should heighten Democrats of their Democratic identity, and it should heighten Republicans of their Republican one. The results of an experiment with 752 American respondents who were representative of the US population supported this polarizing effect of the American flag. The theoretical and policy implications of the findings are offered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)809-818
Number of pages10
JournalBritish Journal of Social Psychology
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • American flag
  • National identity
  • Political ideology
  • Priming cue

Cite this

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title = "Exposure to the American flag polarizes democratic-republican ideologies",
abstract = "Some prior research has suggested that exposure to the American flag tilts Americans towards Republicanism, while others have proffered that it brings outs a common 'together' perspective instead. We explore a third possibility - that it may actually polarize Americans' political ideology. It is generally accepted that exposure to an environmental cue can shift attitudes and behaviours, at least partly or temporarily, in a manner that is consistent with that cue. Yet, the same cue can mean different things to different people. In the same vein, given how national identity and political ideology are intertwined in the United States, we hypothesize that the American flag should heighten different political beliefs depending on individuals' political ideology. To Democrats, being American is to support Democratic values, but to Republicans, being American is to support Republican values. The American flag thus should heighten Democrats of their Democratic identity, and it should heighten Republicans of their Republican one. The results of an experiment with 752 American respondents who were representative of the US population supported this polarizing effect of the American flag. The theoretical and policy implications of the findings are offered.",
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Exposure to the American flag polarizes democratic-republican ideologies. / Chan, Eugene Y.

In: British Journal of Social Psychology, Vol. 56, No. 4, 01.12.2017, p. 809-818.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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