Exploring what the Austin Maze measures: a comparison across conventional and computer versions

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Abstract

The Austin Maze is a neuropsychological assessment tool used to measure cognitive function. A computerised version of the tool has recently been developed and shown to be equivalent to the conventional version in terms of performance. However, controversy remains regarding which specific cognitive constructs the conventional and computer versions of the Austin Maze purport to measure. The aim of this study was to investigate which cognitive constructs are associated with Austin Maze performance and whether these constructs remain equivalent across conventional and computer versions. Sixty-three healthy people completed both conventional and computerised versions of the Austin Maze in addition to a number of established measures of planning, error utilisation, working memory, visuospatial ability and visuospatial memory. Results from a series of regression analyses demonstrated that both versions of the Austin Maze were predominantly associated with visuospatial ability and visuospatial memory. No executive measures, including those of planning, error utilisation or working memory, significantly contributed to any Austin Maze performances. This study complements previous research and supports equivalency of the conventional and computer versions of the Austin Maze.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243 - 252
Number of pages10
JournalBrain Impairment
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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