Exploring physical, emotional, cognitive and social functioning in survivors of stroke with self-reported communication difficulties

T. Thayabaranathan, C. Baker, N.E. Andrew, R. Stolwyk, A.G. Thrift, H. Carter, S.J. Breen, J. Kim, S. Wallace, E. Brogan, Rohan Scott Grimley, N.A. Lannin, M.L. Rose, D.A. Cadilhac

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstractpeer-review

Abstract

Background
Survivors of stroke with communication difficulties have worse quality of life than survivors without this disability.
Aim
To explore the association of self-reported communication difficulties on mental health, cognitive and social functioning in survivors of stroke.
Methods
Self-reported, cross-sectional survey data were obtained between 90–180 days after stroke from eligible registrants in the Australian Stroke Clinical Registry (AuSCR) admitted to three hospitals in Queensland. Standard AuSCR data, including the EuroQol 5D-3L, and additional details of communication difficulties, cognitive function, social participation, and fatigue, as part of those recommended in the International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement Standard Set for Stroke, were obtained. Descriptive statistics are reported.
Results
244 registrants completed the additional survey items, and 72 (30%) reported communication difficulties. When compared to those reporting no communication difficulties (n = 172), those reporting communication difficulties more often reported moderate to extreme problems with all five EuroQoL 5D-3L dimensions: anxiety or depression (74% vs 40%, p < 0.001), pain or discomfort (58% vs 39%, p = 0.006), self-care (46% vs 18%, p < 0.001), usual activities (77% vs 49%, p < 0.001), and mobility (68% vs 35%, p < 0.001). Registrants reporting communication difficulties had some level of fatigue (66% vs 89%, p < 0.001), poor cognitive skills (thinking) (16% vs 1%, p < 0.001), and poor social participation (31% vs 6%, p < 0.001) when compared to those reporting no communication difficulties.
Conclusion
Survivors of stroke with self-reported communication difficulties experience worse multiple comorbidities than survivors without communication difficulties. It is vital to identify and provide appropriate and timely care to survivors with communication difficulties post-stroke.
Original languageEnglish
Article number14672
Pages (from-to)29-30
Number of pages2
JournalInternational Journal of Stroke
Volume16
Issue number1S
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2021
EventAnnual Scientific Meeting of the Stroke-Society-of-Australasia 2021 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the Stroke-Society-of-Australasia 2021, Perth, Australia
Duration: 13 Oct 202115 Oct 2021
https://journals.sagepub.com/toc/wsoa/16/1_suppl

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