Exploring attitudes and affiliation intentions toward consumers who engage in socially shared superstitious behaviors: A study of students in the east and the west

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Abstract

Existing literature on superstitious beliefs focuses on consumer purchasing behavior. However, little is known about how superstition-based consumption behaviors are socially perceived. This paper investigates students attitudes toward consumers who engage in socially shared superstitious behaviors. Two studies show that students from Eastern and Western countries have negative attitudes and lower affiliation intentions toward consumers engaging in socially shared superstitious behaviors. As predicted by social judgment theory, this effect is driven by perceived low competence but not by perceived warmth. These negative attitudes and lower affiliation intentions are moderated by the student s superstitiousness. The managerial implications of social perceptions regarding consumer superstitious behavior are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203 - 213
Number of pages11
JournalPsychology and Marketing
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

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title = "Exploring attitudes and affiliation intentions toward consumers who engage in socially shared superstitious behaviors: A study of students in the east and the west",
abstract = "Existing literature on superstitious beliefs focuses on consumer purchasing behavior. However, little is known about how superstition-based consumption behaviors are socially perceived. This paper investigates students attitudes toward consumers who engage in socially shared superstitious behaviors. Two studies show that students from Eastern and Western countries have negative attitudes and lower affiliation intentions toward consumers engaging in socially shared superstitious behaviors. As predicted by social judgment theory, this effect is driven by perceived low competence but not by perceived warmth. These negative attitudes and lower affiliation intentions are moderated by the student s superstitiousness. The managerial implications of social perceptions regarding consumer superstitious behavior are discussed.",
author = "Di Wang and Harmen Oppewal and Dominic Thomas",
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AB - Existing literature on superstitious beliefs focuses on consumer purchasing behavior. However, little is known about how superstition-based consumption behaviors are socially perceived. This paper investigates students attitudes toward consumers who engage in socially shared superstitious behaviors. Two studies show that students from Eastern and Western countries have negative attitudes and lower affiliation intentions toward consumers engaging in socially shared superstitious behaviors. As predicted by social judgment theory, this effect is driven by perceived low competence but not by perceived warmth. These negative attitudes and lower affiliation intentions are moderated by the student s superstitiousness. The managerial implications of social perceptions regarding consumer superstitious behavior are discussed.

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