Examining the epidemiology of work-related traumatic brain injury through a sex/gender lens

Analysis of workers' compensation claims in Victoria Australia

Vicky C Chang, Rasa Ruseckaite, Alexander Collie, Angela Colantonio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives To provide an overview of the epidemiology of work-related traumatic brain injury (wrTBI) in the state of Victoria, Australia. Specifically, we investigated sex differences in incidence, demographics, injury characteristics, in addition to outcomes associated with wrTBI.

Methods This study involved secondary analysis of administrative workers' compensation claims data obtained from the Victorian WorkCover Authority for the period 2004-2011. Sex-specific and industry-specific rates of wrTBI were calculated using denominators derived from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. A descriptive analysis of all variables was conducted for the total wrTBI population and stratified by sex.

Results Among 4186 wrTBI cases identified, 36.4% were females. The annual incidence of wrTBI was estimated at 19.8/100 000 workers. The rate for males was 1.43 (95% CI 1.35 to 1.53) times that for females, but the gap between the two sexes appeared to have narrowed over time. Compared to males, females were older at time of injury and had lower preinjury income. Males had higher rates than females across most industry sectors, with the exception of education/training (RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.64 to 0.93) and professional/scientific/technical services (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.93). For both sexes, the most common injury mechanism was struck by/against, followed by falls. WrTBI among males was associated with longer duration of work disability and higher claim costs compared to females.

Conclusions This study found significant sex differences in various risk factors and outcomes of wrTBI. Sex/gender should be taken into consideration in future research and prevention strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)695-703
Number of pages9
JournalOccupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume71
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2014

Cite this

@article{abdfbf3bfe6c47c6bc6447d891ac7452,
title = "Examining the epidemiology of work-related traumatic brain injury through a sex/gender lens: Analysis of workers' compensation claims in Victoria Australia",
abstract = "Objectives To provide an overview of the epidemiology of work-related traumatic brain injury (wrTBI) in the state of Victoria, Australia. Specifically, we investigated sex differences in incidence, demographics, injury characteristics, in addition to outcomes associated with wrTBI.Methods This study involved secondary analysis of administrative workers' compensation claims data obtained from the Victorian WorkCover Authority for the period 2004-2011. Sex-specific and industry-specific rates of wrTBI were calculated using denominators derived from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. A descriptive analysis of all variables was conducted for the total wrTBI population and stratified by sex.Results Among 4186 wrTBI cases identified, 36.4{\%} were females. The annual incidence of wrTBI was estimated at 19.8/100 000 workers. The rate for males was 1.43 (95{\%} CI 1.35 to 1.53) times that for females, but the gap between the two sexes appeared to have narrowed over time. Compared to males, females were older at time of injury and had lower preinjury income. Males had higher rates than females across most industry sectors, with the exception of education/training (RR 0.77, 95{\%} CI 0.64 to 0.93) and professional/scientific/technical services (RR 0.64, 95{\%} CI 0.44 to 0.93). For both sexes, the most common injury mechanism was struck by/against, followed by falls. WrTBI among males was associated with longer duration of work disability and higher claim costs compared to females.Conclusions This study found significant sex differences in various risk factors and outcomes of wrTBI. Sex/gender should be taken into consideration in future research and prevention strategies.",
author = "Chang, {Vicky C} and Rasa Ruseckaite and Alexander Collie and Angela Colantonio",
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Examining the epidemiology of work-related traumatic brain injury through a sex/gender lens : Analysis of workers' compensation claims in Victoria Australia. / Chang, Vicky C; Ruseckaite, Rasa; Collie, Alexander; Colantonio, Angela.

In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 71, No. 10, 01.10.2014, p. 695-703.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Examining the epidemiology of work-related traumatic brain injury through a sex/gender lens

T2 - Analysis of workers' compensation claims in Victoria Australia

AU - Chang, Vicky C

AU - Ruseckaite, Rasa

AU - Collie, Alexander

AU - Colantonio, Angela

PY - 2014/10/1

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N2 - Objectives To provide an overview of the epidemiology of work-related traumatic brain injury (wrTBI) in the state of Victoria, Australia. Specifically, we investigated sex differences in incidence, demographics, injury characteristics, in addition to outcomes associated with wrTBI.Methods This study involved secondary analysis of administrative workers' compensation claims data obtained from the Victorian WorkCover Authority for the period 2004-2011. Sex-specific and industry-specific rates of wrTBI were calculated using denominators derived from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. A descriptive analysis of all variables was conducted for the total wrTBI population and stratified by sex.Results Among 4186 wrTBI cases identified, 36.4% were females. The annual incidence of wrTBI was estimated at 19.8/100 000 workers. The rate for males was 1.43 (95% CI 1.35 to 1.53) times that for females, but the gap between the two sexes appeared to have narrowed over time. Compared to males, females were older at time of injury and had lower preinjury income. Males had higher rates than females across most industry sectors, with the exception of education/training (RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.64 to 0.93) and professional/scientific/technical services (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.93). For both sexes, the most common injury mechanism was struck by/against, followed by falls. WrTBI among males was associated with longer duration of work disability and higher claim costs compared to females.Conclusions This study found significant sex differences in various risk factors and outcomes of wrTBI. Sex/gender should be taken into consideration in future research and prevention strategies.

AB - Objectives To provide an overview of the epidemiology of work-related traumatic brain injury (wrTBI) in the state of Victoria, Australia. Specifically, we investigated sex differences in incidence, demographics, injury characteristics, in addition to outcomes associated with wrTBI.Methods This study involved secondary analysis of administrative workers' compensation claims data obtained from the Victorian WorkCover Authority for the period 2004-2011. Sex-specific and industry-specific rates of wrTBI were calculated using denominators derived from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. A descriptive analysis of all variables was conducted for the total wrTBI population and stratified by sex.Results Among 4186 wrTBI cases identified, 36.4% were females. The annual incidence of wrTBI was estimated at 19.8/100 000 workers. The rate for males was 1.43 (95% CI 1.35 to 1.53) times that for females, but the gap between the two sexes appeared to have narrowed over time. Compared to males, females were older at time of injury and had lower preinjury income. Males had higher rates than females across most industry sectors, with the exception of education/training (RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.64 to 0.93) and professional/scientific/technical services (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.93). For both sexes, the most common injury mechanism was struck by/against, followed by falls. WrTBI among males was associated with longer duration of work disability and higher claim costs compared to females.Conclusions This study found significant sex differences in various risk factors and outcomes of wrTBI. Sex/gender should be taken into consideration in future research and prevention strategies.

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DO - 10.1136/oemed-2014-102097

M3 - Article

VL - 71

SP - 695

EP - 703

JO - Occupational and Environmental Medicine

JF - Occupational and Environmental Medicine

SN - 1351-0711

IS - 10

ER -