Evolution of Australian Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (from the Melbourne Interventional Group [MIG] Registry)

Julian Yeoh, Matias B Yudi, Nick Andrianopoulos, Bryan P Yan, David J Clark, Stephen J. Duffy, Angela Brennan, Gishel New, Melanie Freeman, David Eccleston, Martin Sebastian, Christopher M Duffy, William Wilson, Andrew E. Ajani, Melbourne Interventional Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) continues to evolve with shifting patient demographics, treatments, and outcomes. We sought to document the specific changes observed over a 9-year period in a contemporary Australian PCI cohort. The Melbourne Interventional Group is an established multicenter PCI registry in Melbourne, Australia. Data were collected prospectively with 30-day and 12-month follow-ups. Demographic, procedural, and outcome data for all consecutive patients were analyzed with a year-to-year comparison from 2005 to 2013. National Death Index linkage was performed for long-term mortality analysis; 19,858 procedures were captured over 9 years. Patient complexity and acuity increased with a higher proportion of traditional risk factors and more elderly patients who underwent PCI. Angiographic lesion complexity increased with more multivessel coronary artery disease and more American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association type B2/C lesions proceeding to PCI. The 30-day rate of death, myocardial infarction, or target vessel revascularization has not changed nor has 12-month mortality, myocardial infarction, or major adverse cardiovascular event rates. The strongest independent predictor of long-term mortality was cardiogenic shock at presentation (hazard ratio [HR] 2.95, p <0.01). Drug-eluting stent use (HR 0.83, p <0.01) and a history of dyslipidemia (HR 0.81, p <0.01) were associated with long-term survival. In conclusion, from 2005 to 2013, we observed a cohort of higher risk clinical and angiographic characteristics, with stable long-term mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-54
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume120
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017

Cite this

Yeoh, Julian ; Yudi, Matias B ; Andrianopoulos, Nick ; Yan, Bryan P ; Clark, David J ; Duffy, Stephen J. ; Brennan, Angela ; New, Gishel ; Freeman, Melanie ; Eccleston, David ; Sebastian, Martin ; Duffy, Christopher M ; Wilson, William ; Ajani, Andrew E. ; Melbourne Interventional Group. / Evolution of Australian Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (from the Melbourne Interventional Group [MIG] Registry). In: American Journal of Cardiology. 2017 ; Vol. 120, No. 1. pp. 47-54.
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abstract = "Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) continues to evolve with shifting patient demographics, treatments, and outcomes. We sought to document the specific changes observed over a 9-year period in a contemporary Australian PCI cohort. The Melbourne Interventional Group is an established multicenter PCI registry in Melbourne, Australia. Data were collected prospectively with 30-day and 12-month follow-ups. Demographic, procedural, and outcome data for all consecutive patients were analyzed with a year-to-year comparison from 2005 to 2013. National Death Index linkage was performed for long-term mortality analysis; 19,858 procedures were captured over 9 years. Patient complexity and acuity increased with a higher proportion of traditional risk factors and more elderly patients who underwent PCI. Angiographic lesion complexity increased with more multivessel coronary artery disease and more American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association type B2/C lesions proceeding to PCI. The 30-day rate of death, myocardial infarction, or target vessel revascularization has not changed nor has 12-month mortality, myocardial infarction, or major adverse cardiovascular event rates. The strongest independent predictor of long-term mortality was cardiogenic shock at presentation (hazard ratio [HR] 2.95, p <0.01). Drug-eluting stent use (HR 0.83, p <0.01) and a history of dyslipidemia (HR 0.81, p <0.01) were associated with long-term survival. In conclusion, from 2005 to 2013, we observed a cohort of higher risk clinical and angiographic characteristics, with stable long-term mortality.",
author = "Julian Yeoh and Yudi, {Matias B} and Nick Andrianopoulos and Yan, {Bryan P} and Clark, {David J} and Duffy, {Stephen J.} and Angela Brennan and Gishel New and Melanie Freeman and David Eccleston and Martin Sebastian and Duffy, {Christopher M} and William Wilson and Ajani, {Andrew E.} and {Melbourne Interventional Group} and W. Chan and J. Sajeev and V. Chand and D. Dinh and D Stub",
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Evolution of Australian Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (from the Melbourne Interventional Group [MIG] Registry). / Yeoh, Julian; Yudi, Matias B; Andrianopoulos, Nick; Yan, Bryan P; Clark, David J; Duffy, Stephen J.; Brennan, Angela; New, Gishel; Freeman, Melanie; Eccleston, David; Sebastian, Martin ; Duffy, Christopher M; Wilson, William; Ajani, Andrew E.; Melbourne Interventional Group.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 120, No. 1, 01.07.2017, p. 47-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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